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[ The PC Guide | Systems and Components Reference Guide | System Case | Drive Bays ]

Internal Drive Bays

These bays are entirely within the case and are not accessible from the outside. If a device does not require any access from the outside it is preferable to use an internal bay, and save the case's external bays for drives that need them. In practical terms, this means that internal drive bays are usually used for hard disk drives, which do not require any access by the user.

Inside view of a traditional tower case showing five external drive bays
and one internal drive bay (on the bottom.) On a system like this, to
use two hard drives one would normally mount the second one into
an external drive bay and simply leave the cover for that bay in place.

Original image Kamco Services
Image used with permission.

You can of course mount a hard drive into an external drive bay. So in some ways, an internal drive bay is really an "internal only" bay. Some cases in fact do not have any internal drive bays; hard drives are mounted into external drive bays and solid faceplates left to hide the drive from the outside.

Next: Drive Rails and Brackets


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