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Inquiring
02-14-2001, 02:08 PM
I installed Office 2000 Premium to get Access 2000. Was using Access 97. When I updated a table in Access 97 the "update" moved the entry to another unwanted location in the table. Saw a msjet35.dll error message come up that I tried to fix but couldnt. Now the same problem occurs in Access 2000 when attempting to refresh the same table except the message that comes up now is: "Cant do that action at this time". What in the heck does that mean? and why hasnt the problem been solved although Microsoft says Acces 2K solves it?

Thanks.

Ghost_Hacker
02-14-2001, 03:08 PM
It's possibly that the database is corrupt. Have you tried the repair and compact option?

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"It's just a whisper in my Ghost"

Inquiring
02-15-2001, 12:12 AM
Thanks..Ive done that, and it helps..for a bit..then the problem returns..I wonder if the database itself is corrupt?
Maybe just the data corrupt or?
Dont know anymore.


Originally posted by Ghost_Hacker:
It's possibly that the database is corrupt. Have you tried the repair and compact option?

Inquiring
02-15-2001, 12:15 AM
Thanks..Ive done that, and it helps..for a bit..then the problem returns..I wonder if the database itself is corrupt?
Maybe just the data corrupt or?
Dont know anymore.


Originally posted by Ghost_Hacker:
It's possibly that the database is corrupt. Have you tried the repair and compact option?

Ghost_Hacker
02-15-2001, 01:57 PM
Well..... I'm outta ideas. This problem goes beyond anything I've ever encountered. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/frown.gif

But you may be on the right track..it could turn out to be a corrupt database.



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"It's just a whisper in my Ghost"

Inquiring
02-15-2001, 09:20 PM
Ran the suspect database on a PC with Access 97 known to work properly. The SAME error message and data reordering in the table occurred. Leads me to believe that my database is corrupt. Do you know a step by step procedure to import the data from the corrupt database into a a new unused fresh database that I have? Please be specific on the procedure..Im still a dummy with Access 97.
Thanks.


Originally posted by Ghost_Hacker:
Well..... I'm outta ideas. This problem goes beyond anything I've ever encountered. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/frown.gif

But you may be on the right track..it could turn out to be a corrupt database.

Ghost_Hacker
02-16-2001, 11:11 AM
I don't have Access 97 so I don't know if the procedure is the same. But if you open Access 2000 the "Help wizard" can give you the steps to import tables from one database to another. (It's not that hard really).
I'll copy them here too :

Import or link tables from another Microsoft Access database or Microsoft Access project
Note You can link a table only in a Microsoft Access database, not a Microsoft Access project.


Open a database, or switch to the Database window for the open database.


To import tables, on the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Import.
To link tables, on the File menu, point to Get External Data, and then click Link Tables.

In the Import (or Link) dialog box, in the Files Of Type box, make sure that Microsoft Access (*.mdb;*.adp;*.mdw;*.mda;*.mde;*.ade) is selected.


Click the arrow to the right of the Look In box, select the drive and folder where the Access database (.mdb) or Access project (.adp) that you want to import or link is located, and then double-click the database's icon.
Important If you link to a file on a local area network, make to use a universal naming convention (UNC) path, instead of relying on the drive letter of a mapped network drive in Windows Explorer. A drive letter can vary on a computer or may not always be defined, whereas a UNC path is a reliable and consistent way for Microsoft Access to locate the data source that contains the linked table.

In the Import Objects dialog box, click each table that you want to import or link.
If you're importing, and you want to import just the selected tables' definitions (not the data they contain), click Options, and then under Import Tables, click Definition Only. Learn about importing other database objects.
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NOTES
[list]
If you import a table that is already linked, then Microsoft Access does not import the data; instead, it links the table to its data source (in effect, copies the link information).


Although you can import tables from an Access project to an Access database, you might find it more efficient to import the table from Microsoft SQL Server. If you are importing tables from an Access project into an Access project, consider using Data Transformation Services (DTS), which can be a faster and more flexible way to import and transform data. For more information, see the Microsoft SQL Server documentation.


When you import a table into an Access project, Microsoft Access only imports the table data and data definitions, not its properties (including constraints, relationships, and indexes).


If the database that you want to import or link has a database password, then you must provide the password before you can continue. Linking tables from such a database may have unforeseen consequences. For more information, click .


If you link two tables from the same Access database, then any relationship that was established between the tables in the other database remains in effect.


If you import a table that contains Lookup fields into an Access database, then you should also import the tables or queries that the Lookup fields refer to. If you don't do this, when you open the imported table in Datasheet view, Microsoft Accesswill display an error message for each missing table or query. To correct this problem, import the missing tables or queries. If you can't or don't want to import the missing tables or queries, open the imported table in Design view, click on a Lookup field that refers to a missing table or query, click the Lookup tab, and then set the DisplayControl property to Text Box. Repeat this procedure for each Lookup field that refers to a missing table or query.


Hope this helps

http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif

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"It's just a whisper in my Ghost"

[This message has been edited by Ghost_Hacker (edited 02-16-2001).]

Technochic
02-23-2001, 01:51 PM
http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/eek.gif
I hope I'm not too late... but be careful about importing data from a suspected corrupt database (and I think you guys are right about that) into a new database - the data might be what corrupted it in the first place! To be really sure, you should reconstruct the data piece by piece. It may be a pain, but will pretty much guarantee that the same corruption doesn't happen to the new DB.

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"Never underestimate the power of human stupidity" - LL