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Vic 970
07-26-2002, 08:19 PM
56k v90 HAMR voice modem

I have a slow conection. & have tried all sorts of things in the past, contacted isp about 12 months ago, & re send every month. all I get is a reply saying that they will deal with it as quickly as possible.

mostly I get by with it, until there is a lot of traffic.

will anything help to improve it, like a modem accelerator prog?

Jiggy
07-26-2002, 08:36 PM
1. if with BT ring and ask them to turn the GAIN on your line down.

2. i swaped to an external modem and got a better ping.

3. ring your ISP and ask them for another phone number to dail.

4. make friends with someone who has ADSL:D

randyrhoads1981
07-26-2002, 09:46 PM
Most the time those just tweak your Windows to allow the best data transfer it can with the options used..if they even do that :rolleyes:,,may end up being just neatly packaged spyware..if your line or ISP is holding you back then its not really going to make that much of a difference.
Its the same here to man..just a 26k where i'm far in the boonies. No broadband here :( . Trying a differnt number can help sometimes ..hope you have better luck getting them..i asked mine for a differnt one and was told there wasnt any..when in fact they were 9 :o ..I called them back and ..well i wont go there..:D

Whyzman
07-26-2002, 10:49 PM
Following my download of AOL 7.0 I noticed upon connect that the old connection speeds of around 39-42,000 bps suddenly jumped to around 115,200. I thought..."smokin"! I thought, AOL you've put your naysayers to shame!

Yeah, right.....mjc on mIrc one evening, when I was singing praises to my new found Donnybrooke AOL 7.0, pointed out that AOL was now referencing something different.


DTE vs DCE speed. Modem shoppers in stores like CompUSA often ask why they should buy a 56K modem, when their modem already says "connected at 57600" or "connected at 115200". Well, this is a common misunderstanding of what the reported connect speed means. These speeds are the DTE (Data Terminal Equipment) speed, which is the speed of the connection between your PC and your modem. The DCE (Data Communications Equipment) speed is the bottleneck. The DCE speed is the speed between your modem and the other modem you connect to.

The place where I copied this quote from was sporting what appeared to be a type of accelerator...but as Randy points out, they pretty much have to do with what's happening in Windows. They point out that your Web pages will load more quickly...because they are turning off pop-up and banner ads through their software.

Well, good time to put in a plug for Free Enterprise and Capitalism. If the govt. is controlling the competition (little if none) then you can take a number.........Service goes right out the window and price is like a politicians raised voice...full of hot air and rising! :D

Paul Komski
07-27-2002, 10:54 PM
Q1 So does "connected at" (displayed by DUN) always relate to DTE or was this just an AOL7 "trick"? AOL, in any case, do configure their DUN and network protocols differently from the "normal".

Q2 If there is a large disparity between DTE and DCE then if the DCE is already bad can this make matters worse? In other words would it help things if one could slow down DTE in such circumstances.

Q3 Is DCE directly proportional to Ping time (all other things like line-noise, modem drivers, network settings etc. being equal)? I had always assumed that Ping times were a function of traffic/bandwidth - was this correct/incorrect?

:p

mjc
07-28-2002, 12:53 AM
DUN can display either one, but not both. Basically what AOL was doing was displaying the faster speed and not bothering the verify that it was actually displaying the proper one, most people want the speed between the modem and the rest of the world, not between the modem and their machine.

You always want the connection between the modem and the computer to be at least twice as fast as the maximum modem speed. This allows for compression.

Ping times are affected by bandwidth/traffic mostly, server load and few other things, not usually the connnection between modem and computer, unless the port speed is too low and decompressing the data stream (hardware) slows everything down.

Paul Komski
07-28-2002, 06:46 AM
Thanks mjc - bit by bit (no pun intended) the crazy jigsaw of how computers talk to each can be put together. Since my Qs and your As, I did a bit of sniffing (no pun intended again) and found a whole new world relating to the software APIs, RPCs, Different Protocol/Packet Handling, Timing Out, Port Navigation, ......... etc. And all of that without even considering the actual MOdulationDEMoldulation.

Well I'm not getting into that deep water (just yet anyway). But wouldn't it be nice if the ordinary user could have an easy (and preferably graphical) way of determining just where the bottlenecks in communication are actually occurring - esp. since most of these parameters can be logged in some way or another. It might make troubleshooting toooooo easy though; but it would help point the finger at an ISP or Telecom when the fault does lies with them. ;) ;)

rahulkothari
07-28-2002, 08:59 AM
Paul: But wouldn't it be nice if the ordinary user could have an easy (and preferably graphical) way of determining just where the bottlenecks in communication are actually occurring.

You may install some kind of bandwidth monitor which shows the actual download and upload speed. Try this (http://www.dumeter.com) one.


mjc:Ping times are affected by bandwidth/traffic mostly, server load and few other things, not usually the connnection between modem and computer, unless the port speed is too low and decompressing the data stream (hardware) slows everything down.

Does that mean that if you have a 56.6 kbps modem installed on a 33Mhz or slower computer, your internet access speed will reduce ?
or simply, on which factors other than modem/lan card does internet speed depend ?

Fruss Tray Ted
07-28-2002, 10:47 AM
Originally posted by rahulkothari


Does that mean that if you have a 56.6 kbps modem installed on a 33Mhz or slower computer, your internet access speed will reduce ?
or simply, on which factors other than modem/lan card does internet speed depend ?

Not exactly. It doesn't take a whole lot of speed to handle 56,000 'baud' per second. but your faster frequency processors DO save time by filing/analizing quicker and replying the correct response for additional info back and forth repeatedly. So although they are not entirely the same thing, they are related to the same end result.

RAM also affects the ability of the OS to process the info from the modem.

At least that's MY cloudy perception on the issue at this point ;)

Paul Komski
07-28-2002, 12:21 PM
Webopedia - Baud (http://www.pcwebopedia.com/TERM/b/baud.html)

Vic 970
07-28-2002, 06:15 PM
I thought that you had the gain turned UP for a better connection? (which I have done.)

I have got DU meter from link above, & it's interesting to see the speeds go up & down. (top speed so far 11.7) I figure these (changing) figures relate to the various parts of the route?

If so then who is resposible for being able to access that route?

I remember reading somewhere that the modem sends out (I think) 4 signals to find the best track to the site requested & that you can alter that to improve the situation, anyone know?

Paul Komski
07-28-2002, 07:22 PM
Trying-out DU meter too; but apart from its skin and a few custom setups, I don't think it gives any more info than can be got from the Windows' Resource Meter (which is totally free and on which you can monitor a larger range of pc components).

I doubt if they relate to the different parts of the route (which would be nice) but just to what activity is taking place into and out of the modem. If you were analysing a fairly constant input (say doing nothing except a file download) then I would anticipate a fairly flat trace; unless this was being affected by cpu activity (which you can also analyse simultaneously with Resource Meter) and thereby, indirectly, the effectiveness of the modem's drivers, when using a winmodem.

When you Ping, I think 4 packets get sent out; but I don't think there's anyway to control the routing that packets take once out there on the net.

One of the things about Opera is that you get a quantitative speed as each page downloads. This seems to bear no relation to the "DialUpConnectionSpeed" whatsoever and is obviously as much affected by the server side of things as the linkage to one's own ISP. What I have noticed is that these speeds are best at times when local internet usage is least (eg during World Cup Games when Ireland were playing) and worst just after 6pm, when cheap-rate dial-ups begin. The "connected at" can vary from 18-38kbs without ever seeming to affect the displayed speeds in Opera.

Those that really understand networking might have proper answers or descriptions of what and how to analyse such data.

Vic 970
07-29-2002, 02:39 PM
got to agree Paul, DU meter doesn't give a lot of useful info, it's just interesting how it varies when searching (& drops to zero when you lose a link)

it's all a bit of a minefield still to me, but I did read somewhere that you could adjust the number of 'packets' sent out (possibly in reg) which is supposed to increase the chances of getting a good connection.

If I manage to find it I'll let you know.

Paul Komski
07-29-2002, 03:27 PM
It IS a minefield; and not helped (in my own experience) by the attitude and service provided by the Telecoms and ISPs. I'm going to have to get a modern Hardware modem (which the good folks here are always advising) if only to just take the negative aspects of a WinModem out of the equation, when trying to analyse a slow dial-up. Would just prefer to have less rather than more desktop clutter.

Vic 970
07-29-2002, 04:26 PM
I've just complained to my ISP (again) & threatened to take my custom elsewhere. meanwhile I'm just having a look at d/l speeds so that I can compare when I change.