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Steve
10-02-2002, 08:05 PM
What's the party line on ESD and working on laptops?

Do I ground myself to the frame? It doesn't seem to be metal, anyway. Should I have it plugged in to AC power, or not? Do I ground myself, to the frame and then unplug the AC?

How do I handle ESD and laptops effectively?

Budfred
10-02-2002, 09:36 PM
I hook my wrist ESD thing to another grounded source to work on a computer, I don't keep the one I am working on plugged in. I would suggest doing the same thing in general and particularly with a laptop.

Budfred

david eaton
10-03-2002, 03:59 PM
Steve. You might also consider obtaining some anti-static matting to cover your workspace (table/whatever) I have mine covered that way, and it is connected to mains ground.

Don't know where you can buy it, as mine fell off a lorry!:D Was left behind from a job at my old works. I think it's rather expensive, so may not be worthwhile for one-off jobs, but a good safety precaution.

David

Steve
10-03-2002, 08:43 PM
Thank,

Budfred, what is that "'other grounded source" that you connect to?

David, thanks for the tip. I know that in general, ANY antistatic measure would be beneficial. Specifics are good.

Someone once gave me this GAP (generally approved procedure) for desktops.

AT...turn off computer. Leave plugged in. The AC cord provides a ground through the frame.
ATX...turn off computer. Open case and ground yourself on the frame. Unplug computer because ATX motherboards are energized even when the power is off. Go to work.

Is there a GAP for laptops?

Budfred
10-03-2002, 08:54 PM
I have my old Compaq linux box on a table behind where I have been building a new computer. I have the face cover off and I clip my wrist thing onto the frame there. That computer is plugged into a surge protector which is turned off, so it is grounded, but not powered. I use a ESD wrist thing with 10 feet of coiled connector so I can move around pretty freely.

If the ATX case is unplugged, how is it grounded?? And if you work in a case that is plugged in, it would seem that you risk a short fligtht across the room from a rather more impressive electrical charge than the static would produce.:eek: I prefer to stay away from the guts of electrical things that are plugged in.:)

Budfred

Steve
10-03-2002, 09:59 PM
Budfred, I think the idea is ground yourself and then unplug the atx.

I guess setting up a grounding system seperate from the computer at hand would be the way to go.

I guess there's no party line. Each to his own ground? :)

Budfred
10-03-2002, 10:06 PM
"Budfred, I think the idea is ground yourself and then unplug the atx."

But static charge can build up again as you are working, so if you don't maintain a ground, you can still fry computer innards.

Budfred

Steve
10-04-2002, 04:48 PM
That computer is plugged into a surge protector which is turned off, so it is grounded, but not powered. I use a ESD wrist thing with 10 feet of coiled connector so I can move around pretty freely.

That's an interesting idea. If I'm working on my laptop or an atx desktop, could I keep them plugged into a surge strip that is off and still have them grounded? That sounds like a very easy solution...:)

Budfred
10-04-2002, 09:06 PM
I believe that would work as long as you keep in contact with the grounded computer whenever you touch any components.

Budfred

mjc
10-04-2002, 09:26 PM
A real good idea that has been discussed several tomes before is to plug the machine into a plain old power-strip (one with a lighted power switch), and kill the switch. This will give you the davantage of still being plugged in but with no power...

Steve
10-05-2002, 07:56 AM
Thanks guys, I think I've got it...:)