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olopbob
10-20-2002, 05:07 AM
If I create new partitions on HD can I then move my programs, all files and folders (audio,graphics and text) into the storage partition, format and reinstall XP and Linux on two other partitions and still have access to stored items on the O/S partitions?

note: I'll be using Partition Magic.

sleddog
10-20-2002, 08:00 AM
You need to be aware of the capabilities of each OS with respect to file systems:

- Linux is able to read and write partitions formatted FAT32 or it's native ext2 (or the newer ext3).

- XP is able to read and write partitions formatted FAT32 or NTFS.

- XP cannot read or write to Linux ext2 or ext3 partitions.

- Linux cannot (safely) write to NTFS partitions, though it can read from NTFS.

So if you format your XP and data-storage partitions using FAT32, Linux can have full read/write access. But Linux partitions (formatted ext2 or ext3) will not be accessible from XP.

After both OS's are installed, you can add a new directory in Linux (called maybe /data) and mount your data-storage partition there. You would then have direct read-write access. That partition will of course also be visible in XP. If you need to access a file using XP that is stored in a Linux ext2 partition, you could simple move or copy that file to /data.

There are other ways of doing it, but this is probably the simplest.

A very minimal partitioning scheme might be something like this:

1. XP operating system & apps ("C" drive in XP, /dev/hda1 in Linux).
2. Linux root partition, mounted at / and identified as /dev/hda5.
3. Linux swap partition, /dev/hda6.
4. data-storage partition ("D" drive in XP, /dev/hda7 mounted at /data in Linux).

In this scheme, partitions 2, 3 and 4 are logical drives in an extended partition. Linux users will usually separate applications, user data and temp files into separate partitions, so a more elaborate scheme might be:

1. XP operating system & apps ("C" drive in XP, /dev/hda1 in Linux).
2. Linux root partition, mounted at / and identified as /dev/hda5.
3. Linux swap partition, /dev/hda6.
4. Linux applications, mounted at /usr and identified as /dev/hda7.
5. Linux temp files, mounted at /var and identified as /dev/hda8.
6. Linux user data, mounted at /home and identified as /dev/hda9.
7. data-storage partition ("D" drive in XP, /dev/hda10 mounted at /data in Linux).

Again, partitions 2-7 are logical drives in an extended partition. In Linux you would symlink /tmp to /var/tmp to ensure all temp files go to the temp partition.

The size of individual partitions will depend on the size of your harddrive (and for Linux swap partition, the size of your RAM).

olopbob
10-20-2002, 01:31 PM
If I am understanding correctly, to accomplish what I want, first I will move XP data into second drive which I have reformatted back to fat 32, then reformat my NTFS first partition back into Fat 32 and after creating these 2 fat32 partitions, the first cotaining no logical drives just the XP "c drive", the second containing 3-6 logical drives including XP,s
D drive, as well as Linux swap,user,data,temp and root files each mounted as /dev/hda(1-7),the setup will be complete.

I hope Partition Magic has wizards or will walk me through this.

What is symlink /tmp to /var/tmp ?

I will still have the ability to create 2 additional partitions.
I actually wanted to install Redhat as well as Mandrake and try both.
Could I use one of these partitions and place the second Linux OS on it and follow the earlier steps to create the same swap,user,data,temp and root files each mounted as /dev/hda(1-7).

Then using the final partition create an empty partition just for all the unused space, critical files, and expansion space for partitions
1-3 ?

I feel like I should get graded on this since I can't use a krip sheet.

Did I at least get a "c"

sleddog
10-21-2002, 08:39 AM
Phew!! This is getting a little confusing :)

If you aren't familiar with Linux and the process of installing multi-boot systems then I would suggest:

1. Don't attempt installing two Linux distributions plus XP. Concentrate on getting one Linux distribution installed and working along with XP. It's much less confusion.

2. If this is your first Linux install (meaning you haven't really worked with it before) then do a simple one-partition install (no separate partitions for /home, /usr, etc.). Chances are very good you will be re-installing it in a more "customized" way in the near future as you learn more. For a first install, just get it up and running.

3. Install Mandrake. Most first-time Linux users find it easier to install and work with. Overall it is more user-friendly than Red Hat. And I say that as a longtime Red Hat user! :)

So go for a simple partition scheme:

1. XP (formatted FAT32)
2. Linux Mandrake (formatted ext2)
3. Linux swap
4. Data (formatted FAT32)

Now you need a plan for how to get them dual-booting properly. There is lots of info about this on the web. For a start read http://www.openwaters.net/linux/

yawningdog
10-21-2002, 06:59 PM
I use a similar system. I dual boot Mandrake 9.0 and win98 on one drive, and use another old drive to "archive" stuff. The archive drive I use to store both linux and windows files. (Like java jre and stuff). The archive drive is accessible from either linux or windows, as it is formatted FAT. I find this arrangement quite convenient and I expect it will work with a partition too.