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View Full Version : Connection speed control (how to setup limits ?)



guterfachmann
11-10-2002, 01:41 PM
Hi friends,

im looking for a software to control of connection speed (on my workstation in LAN). I need to setup speed limit for all internet applications (http, ftp, p2p,....).

I have problems with our network administrator for my high-speed downloading. It's possible to setup speed limit for all internet applications? Does exist some "connectivity manager" for Win98?

Thanks for help

Guterfachmann

Ghost_Hacker
11-11-2002, 05:30 AM
If your network admin is smart, he'll be watching his network traffic usage and will proable have alarms setup for when that usage goes above a certain point. It's then very easy, with the right monitoring tool, to find the "network hog".


I wouldn't recommend you try to get around the guy, unless your sure it won't cause you any problems at work.


By the way,just how much of a speed increase (or perhaps decrease) do you need?

guterfachmann
11-12-2002, 06:43 AM
Hi Ghost_Hacker!

Thanks for your tips. However my problems have other fundamental.
Our admin sent me in e-mail a punctual explanation. Volume of my downloaded datas is excessive, but it effect no serious problems in LAN. The problem is abnormal high priority of my packets on server - every others man in LAN stand then "behind".
Its for me very difficult case.
Do you have an useful idea?
Thanks
Guterfachmann
P.S. I am interesting for "p2p datas sharing", mainly for technology "Direct Connect" (DC++).



Originally posted by Ghost_Hacker
If your network admin is smart, he'll be watching his network traffic usage and will proable have alarms setup for when that usage goes above a certain point. It's then very easy, with the right monitoring tool, to find the "network hog".


I wouldn't recommend you try to get around the guy, unless your sure it won't cause you any problems at work.


By the way,just how much of a speed increase (or perhaps decrease) do you need?

Ghost_Hacker
11-12-2002, 09:21 AM
First,Let me make sure I know what we're talking about. :)
DC++ has priority downloads which is not the same thing as a priority packet.

So is your admin saying then that your downloads are taking priority over others users downloads on the server?


Or is he saying that your network traffic is getting priority over other traffic on the network? (including traffic that has nothing to do with DC++)


Also what operating system do you use?

guterfachmann
11-13-2002, 05:52 AM
Hi Ghost_Hacker!

Admin wrote in e-mail (letter for letter) : ... your applied software is determining for your packets a highest priority and then is the speed of internet applications on other workstations decreasing....

I think, main problem is in using DC++. Its a chance to using DIRECT CONNECT SHARING TECHNOLOGY without this "positive-negative" impression on packets priority?
(I cant really leave my downloading....)

Thank you
Guterfachmann

P.S. Sorry for my beginners english (all phrases are only improvisation with dictionary)...

guterfachmann
11-13-2002, 06:34 AM
Hi Ghost_Hacker!

I'm using Widows98, on server are installed Widows2000Pro. LAN is combined 10/100 Mbps (my PC is in 10Mbps leg), connection from provider is 10Mbps (cable).
Network adapter in my PC : 3Com EtherLink III ISA (in PnP mode).

Thanks
G.

Ghost_Hacker
11-13-2002, 09:24 AM
Try this open the "file" menu and choose "settings" click the "advanced" tab. Now click the option to "use small send buffers....".


I see nothing about DC++ that would allow it to set the priority of it's network traffic. However, because its a P2P program, use by "outsiders" of your host may cause problems on your network. (which is why I suggest the "small send buffers" option. This option is really designed to help the host computer not the host network, but lets give it a try.) You might also want to go to the "downloads" tab and make sure that you specify the number of "download slots". (try 1 or 2 for now. remember that 0 is unlimted.)



Other than that I would say your network admin is simply complaining about the amount of P2P traffic you computer is generating ,possible because your network segment is sharing it's "speed". (IE: your connected to a hub)


EDIT It's also possible that your network admin might have setup his network to prioritize all network traffic from and to your computer.( I notice your a Doctor) In which case your P2P traffic would also take priority over others on your segment. But that's just a theory. :)


In either case, cutting down on the amount of P2P traffic should help.

Good Luck :)

guterfachmann
11-14-2002, 05:06 AM
Hi Ghost_Hacker!

Thanks for your goodwill to help me.

Something about our admin : He is not helpful or friendly guy. I can see NO POSSIBILITY, that "admin might have setup his network to prioritize all network traffic from and to my computer". Up to now he executed only limitations (e.g. from 10 Mbps to 128 kbps for our segment of LAN) !!!

I will try downloading with "small send buffers" option. How does work this option? If priority of my packets will be still too high, or will be even higher.... Auuuuuuu.... It can be my death.... (:-))

Thanks
G.

Ghost_Hacker
11-14-2002, 08:52 AM
The "small send" option might help if people download data from your machine, so it's worth a try. Also don't forget to use the "download slots" option to control how many downloads your system runs at the same time. The idea behind using either of these options is to control the amount of network traffic DC++ generates at any one time.


I belive that your network admin is simply complaining about your DC++ traffic and is using "techno-talk" to confuse you. Because network priority of packets is not done at the user level but must be done at the network level by your admin. If he's not doing it then nobody else can. (So it's very possible that nothing you do will help :( )


Good Luck :)

guterfachmann
11-15-2002, 03:44 AM
Hi Ghost_Hacker!

Thank you for all.
There is no other way now : my "files sharing" is close to end.
Because our admin is an angry old men (and he dont like doctors, really, he said me so...).

Goodbye and thanks
G.