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jjoel
11-19-2002, 10:50 AM
hi im a senior in highschool but still undecided on a major. i was thinking about computer networking but dont know if i really could do that as a career. i love to tinker around with hardware though. pull out pci cards etc etc etc. i was wondering if their are high paying hardware people jobs out there? i've always thought that all hardware people are just computer fixer people.
i've also thought about going into electronic engineering, but LOL that's lots of calculas and physics and im not quite sure if i can tackle that. please let me know what jobs in computers you see that will become heavily demanded within the next 2 to 4 years. thank you!

Jeremy

Steve
11-19-2002, 06:13 PM
Jeremy,

I know this doesn't really answer your question but here is my take on things. Figure out what you like to do and don't worry about the money.

Most of your life is going to consist of... You get up in the morning. Go to work. Come home and do some entertaining deversion. If you're not to tired that is. Then you go to bed. Day after day. Year after year. No matter how much money you make, you get up. Go to work. Come home. Go to bed. You might as well spend your time doing something you enjoy. Money isn't all it's cracked up to be.

IMHO, of course...:)

deddard
11-19-2002, 07:10 PM
Just to echo the above post - figure out what you like doing, and then do it.
Electronic engineering is worlds apart from pc repair and networking - I studied electronic servicing for 3 years, and that is quite usefull now I'm studying computer technology (A+ at the moment).
Electronic engineering is indeed a lot of mathematics - way above my head.
The lecturer who used to teach me showed me some of the stuff - it may as well have been in japanese! However, on a practical electronics level, we knew more than them. It all depends what you want.
Engineering will point you towards design, whereas other possibilities (servicing, build, networking etc) are much more varied.

I'm going on to study networks in more depth, with an emphasis on security. Just take a look around, take your time and don't rush it.
There's always going to be a place in IT for technically minded people - just don't jump into a field because of the money; job satisfaction is a MAJOR concern;)

aussieolie2
11-20-2002, 03:36 PM
I have these same type of questions and this is one of the threads that I got a lot of replies on:
http://www.pcguide.com/vb/showthread.php?s=&threadid=17592
No money is not everything, but it is still important. You want to be able to rely on no one else except yourself and only spend what is yours, that way you wont end up in trouble (e.g. credit card debit etc..).
If you want work in Hardware developement, you will need to head to Asia, they specilise in the most hardware in the world.
Hardware repair (as in soldering iron to board etc..) is def not what you want to get into, as its cheaper and quicker to go out and replace the part these days.
Experiance I have learnt is everything. From the age of 12 I was installing workstations on NT 3.51 and 4 was just coming out. Networking is cool, and there is a lot of work areas. You may be interested in becoming a network engineer. I am about to start a degree in network engineering and also Business management. Business + IT go well, + experiance is the best combination.

Good Luck,

Olie

yawningdog
11-20-2002, 10:46 PM
i've also thought about going into electronic engineering, but LOL that's lots of calculas and physics and im not quite sure if i can tackle that.

This is the biggest mistake you can make at this point in your life. Ditch this attitude NOW and get your brain in gear. Yes, this stuff is hard, and yes you may even fail a couple of courses in the attempt, but eventually you will succeed. A great man once said "Whether you think you're a winner, or think you're a loser, you're right."


Most of your life is going to consist of... You get up in the morning. Go to work. Come home and do some entertaining deversion. If you're not to tired that is. Then you go to bed. Day after day. Year after year. No matter how much money you make, you get up. Go to work. Come home. Go to bed.

This simply isn't true. Ask any Marine. Or for that matter, anybody else with a fulfilling job. Your life's work will be what you make it. Period.

jjoel
11-20-2002, 10:59 PM
im not looking for big bucks guys. im just wondering what kinda money their is in hardware. i mean a guy who eventually has a family can't flip burgars the rest of his life if he enjoys it. well, i guess you could but he'd haev to marry a rich girl.

i understand money isn't hte main goal but i wnat to look into something where i can survive from the pay. i still am leaning towards the engineering. even though i am worried about hte math and science i figure i could struggle thorough it. anywayz
thanks for the help guys! hope to see some more soon.

Jeremy

Steve
11-21-2002, 12:28 AM
ummm... maybe I've been misunderstood.


This simply isn't true. Ask any Marine. Or for that matter, anybody else with a fulfilling job. Your life's work will be what you make it. Period.

Boil it down and I bet any marine gets up in the morning, goes to work, comes home, goes to bed. Over and over . Just like anyone else.

The guy who related this little fact of life to me has over 100 million dollars! Richer than anyone I've ever met. The point he was making was that if you're going to go to work every day, it may as well be at something you enjoy. Because that's all there is.

If you don't like being a marine, why in Gods name would you do it? A marine is a marine because he/she finds satisfaction in doing it. Day in...day out. Year in...year out.

As far as working with hardware?


i love to tinker around with hardware though. pull out pci cards etc etc etc.

So go for it. There are many people living their lives being a PC repair tech. 25-30 grand a year. It's a good honest job. You don't have to apologize to anyone if that is what you like to do.

You can make all the money in the world and still not be satisfied. Or you can do what you enjoy and smile not only on the way to work, but on the way home too.

jjoel
11-21-2002, 07:47 AM
that's my problem, i like to tinker with parts but i also like doing other computer stuff. i just dont like coding (programming) eww. and i haven't been too fond of networking either (its been kinda ok). anywayz maybe engineering is my thing. or something along those lines. maybe i'll get electricuted with me being an "electrical engineer" LOL

anywayz, im going back into the restroom, im only up this early cause i have this nasty stomach ache :( :mad:

Budfred
11-21-2002, 11:56 AM
jjoel,

I want to chime in on the pursuing your dream thing. What I have found is that my direction has changed several times as I encounter new experiences and things that I didn't think I could do at one time come easily to me after experience in the real world. School is about learning to learn and getting exposed to ideas. If you have trouble in one area of school, figure out a way to learn what you need to learn and don't worry too much if you don't get it right away. If you enjoy what you are doing, you will get there. Remember the often repeated bit about Einstein in school. He had trouble with math, but somehow he figured it out....

Budfred

chadharris
11-21-2002, 04:37 PM
i thought i would throw in my 2 cents becuase i am actually studying at DeVry University for a bachlors in Eelectronic Engineering Technology. Its a 3 year degree here and with 3 trimesters a year (summer, fall, spring) I'm currently in my second semester of the first year. All has gone good so far, the classes are definatley difficult at times. I am not one that loves math at all but i am getting through it alright. actually some of the EE (electronic engineering) classes are much more difficult to comprehend than advanced math. I love to work with hardware componets just like you. i built my own computer and love "tinkering" with it and adding to it when i have the money. i'm so absessed with it that is cuts into spending time with my family. but besides that i am the same as you. i came to devry because i like playing with hardware. but as the previous post said. EET might not be exactly what your looking for. as i found out, it is geared more to the actual design and inter workings of microchips, voltages, ohms, current (ohms law in general). basically everything that is on those green circuit boards you study all the way down to the scientific atomic makeup. its vary indepth and complicated at times. sometimes way to much to process to me. but i believe that once i graduate i can take this degree and start whatever i want. i actually want to work for like compaq, hq, sony and design the computers that are sent out to the end users. options for the EET field are unlimited. i have also found this out as well. money is not everything, at all. i wanted to become a piolt and start presuing that for the money but i hated it and quit. i wanted to goto the navy and hate it, i got a medical discharge while in bootcamp thank god! so i finally decieded to do something i like and that was working with computers. thats why i at devry, not for the money, but becuase i want to work with computers. average salary for a person with a EET degree is 41-45k first year after grauation. which isnt bad at all!

hope this helps!
chad.

jjoel
11-21-2002, 05:06 PM
yea, i also thought about designing like cpu and mobo's might be cool too. i think as long as im working with my hands and not on my butt all day (like school) i think i'll be happy. one thing about networking is it takes most of the time to sit down, install drivers, get ip's and other stuff. i rather get in and use my two own hands to fix or destroy something haha.

yawningdog
11-21-2002, 10:39 PM
Boil it down and I bet any marine gets up in the morning, goes to work, comes home, goes to bed. Over and over . Just like anyone else.

Couldn't be less true. As a range safety inspector at Fort Pickett, I saw a lot of hard soldiers come and go. (I don't consider myself among them.) They spend every training moment as if they're a hair's breadth from their demise. Tireless, lean, hungry, and on a perpetual hunt for victory. That was the 2nd armor as I witnessed them. Same goes for the Rangers, Force Recon, and Army S.F. To these guys, the rise and set of the sun doesn't tell them when its time to sleep or awake, but when its safe or risky to move.

How about it hiredgoonz? Back me up on this?

jjoel
11-21-2002, 11:04 PM
question #1: what does IT stand for?
question #2: what jobs should be going up in demand within the next few years?

Budfred
11-21-2002, 11:16 PM
IT = Information Technology

Jobs in the next 2 years: anybody's guess, but it is likely that there will be another surge in computer related jobs over the next few years. I don't expect a major economic recovery for at least 2 years, but I think the needs for computer expertise has been deferred for a while and there will be a surge in that area sooner. Also, I think people are going to be holding on to systems longer now, so basic repair and troubleshooting will probably continue to be in demand.

Budfred

HeadachesAbound
11-22-2002, 02:51 PM
Speaking from experience...

I went to college for the purpose of obtaining a degree in Management Information Systems (Combination Business / Programming / Networking / EE). I left college due to grade issues and have learned more in the last 5 years than I would have had I stayed in school. If you can handle the classes then it is recommended that you get a degree in something that you enjoy. If you don't enjoy it then you won't get anywhere. I currently have the ability to write code in a variety of languages (C, VB, PHP, ASP, etc.) on a variety of platforms for the purpose of doing any number of things. I took some electronics classes and truly enjoyed those more than programming. Go where you want and if you are truly great at what you enjoy then the money will soon follow. It may take a few years but the money will follow. I currently pull in 31,200 a year before taxes. Not a gold rush but better than some. In the next few years there will be a decline in true PC Usage as the companies driving the industry are attempting to make the PC more like an appliance. The hardware will continue to evolve and it would make more sense to obtain a degree in the Electronics field. Just keep in mind that any area where computers are involved will require mathematical knowledge. I spend more of my time working out mathematical calculations than I do actually writing code or fixing machines.

Just my 2 cents...

whitt
03-01-2003, 12:15 AM
I'm currently a hardware technician and I'm earning close to 30,000, not counting my benefits package. I work on all hardware related problems in a large office environment. I have just been working on computers and printers now for about 3 years. When I decided to get involved with computers I figured I wanted to start at the "physical" layer. I'm learning so much this way. Plus I'm in a huge playground for my studies (future certifications). It's a great feeling when someone high up in the "computer chain" needs help for a simple hardware problem. I get to see a lot of different things as well. For instance this morning someone moved a printer and no one could print to it. This printer was moved within the same building but to a different subnet. That was fun. The printer was pulling an IP address, just not the right one. I get to learn a lot. Eventually I want to administer the networks though. If it takes 10 years it will be worth it. I can say also that I would much rather work for a smaller company. Working for a large company can be quite stressful. Policies and procedures...policies and procedures....policies and procedures...layoffs...policies and procedures.....