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BaseT
01-12-2005, 08:46 AM
What is the difference between the 802.11n and the 802.11g? Is one better, faster, less conflicts than the other?

pave_spectre
01-12-2005, 09:03 AM
802.11n will be faster than g, with speed up to 108Mb bringing wireless standards to a comparable level with wired networks.

However at this time since the full 802.11n standard does not seem to have been finalised, there only seem to be devices that are pre-n.
This means they may have the speeds specified in the n standard, but that it may be done in a proprietary manner making the device incompatible with others from different manufacturer, and that the device may not be updateable to true n compatibility when the standard is finally completed.

Hopefully someone can correct me if my info is a little out of date.

EDIT-- Just looked at a couple of the devices capable of 108Mbps, and not one of them mentions the 802.11n standard, but instead refer to terms like Super-G

saphalline
01-12-2005, 03:47 PM
There are indeed a few pre-n products out there. They are currently using n technologies that haven't been finalized, so while the n is there, it's not the final version of n. So be wary of pre-n products like pave_spectre says!

PDACPA
01-31-2005, 01:45 PM
Question regarding the speed. I know most refer to the speed with respect to internet access, but does the wireless router speed affect the connection to the server?

I currently have a 802.11b and it works fine on the net pulling websites, but when I try and pull up some infor from our server hard drive it is very slow. Would it improve with a faster router (say a G)?

Thanks
David

FastLearner
01-31-2005, 03:27 PM
Does your server have an 11g capable NIC? What do you consider very slow? Has it always been like this?

Improving the speed of only one network component will not increase the overall networking speed. If you want 11g speed from your workstation to your server, then every variable betwwen those two points needs to be 11g compliant--the workstation NIC, the router, and the server NIC.

PDACPA
01-31-2005, 05:30 PM
I have a a small network all hardwired with ethernet cards that run to a hub. I just added the wireless component for one workstation. The NIC and Hub I think are the 100. The hardwired desktop stations work fine. It is the wireless one that appears much slower. Minutes to open a program and access a file vs seconds on one of the hardwired workstation. This is a network program (Paperless office File Cabinet) that puts some files on your workstation but basically resides on the server. I am trying to increase the speed with with I can open that program and open the client files within it. I was thinking that the speed of the wireless router was determining how slow (fast) that particular workstation worked as the rest of the workstations that are not wireless work fine.

Thanks.

FastLearner
02-01-2005, 12:13 PM
Oh I see, so the speed issue is only happening with the wireless connection. This is normal for a couple of reasons, and yes, upgrading your router and workstation NIC to 11g will improve your speed, since you are using 11b at the moment.

1) Maximum speed of 802.11b standards sits at 11Mbps. Even if you got the maximum performance from that, you are still transferring data at roughly 1/10 the speed of your Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps) connected computers.

2) And if that's not enough, any encryption you are using is slowing your networtk down--fact of life and nothing you can really do about it if security is important to you. I have heard of cases where using WPA can hit the network performance by up to 75% (which in your case would result in throughput of around 3 Mbps--1/30 the speed of your Fast Ethernet connections). If you are using WEP, expect a slow down, as well--up to 50% in some cases.

Bumping up to 11g will increase the maximum throughput (which is never really achieved) to 54 Mbps. Even with no encryption, it will still be slower than your hard-wired machines--probably just not as noticeable.

Unfortunately, wireless requires security, which requires encryption, which requires bandwidth--which kills network speed...:(

classicsoftware
02-01-2005, 02:19 PM
Juast an aiside, the while 802.11 series is a joke.

G is faster than B, but B is slower slower than A?

and what happened to
802.11C
802.11D
802.11E
802.11F
802.11H
802.11I
802.11J
802.11K
802.11L
802.11M

This is the most retarted standard setting organization in the world. I think some of the electrical engineers have helped themselves to some of the stuff the chemical engineers invented.

DON"T buy and pre anything standards.

There is now an enhanced or super or fast G whatever that really means....

Also the different standards operate at different frequencies. Are there any other cordless or wireless devices in the office, like cordless phones? 2.4 Ghz phones can interfere with 2.4ghz wireless networks leading to lack of speed up to lack of connectivity.

UserNameIsBorin
07-01-2008, 01:50 AM
802.11n will be faster than g, with speed up to 108Mb bringing wireless standards to a comparable level with wired networks.

However at this time since the full 802.11n standard does not seem to have been finalised, there only seem to be devices that are pre-n.
This means they may have the speeds specified in the n standard, but that it may be done in a proprietary manner making the device incompatible with others from different manufacturer, and that the device may not be updateable to true n compatibility when the standard is finally completed.

Hopefully someone can correct me if my info is a little out of date.

EDIT-- Just looked at a couple of the devices capable of 108Mbps, and not one of them mentions the 802.11n standard, but instead refer to terms like Super-G

You guys are all stupid. Bow down to my superiority -
http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=565
- Real 'N' Wireless network.

mjc
07-01-2008, 02:12 AM
Gee, some folks never learn...

Adios, UserNameIsBorin...

PrntRhd
07-01-2008, 02:19 AM
248 Mbit/s data rate is max for 802.11-N, but the real world speed depends on the device adapters working with the router.


You guys are all stupid. Bow down to my superiority -
http://redwing.hutman.net/~mreed/warriorshtm/enfantprovocateur.htm
From UserNameIsBorin's link:

BENEFITS OF A WIRELESS N ROUTER
This Wireless N Router uses draft 802.11n technology with multiple external antennas to maximize the speed and range of your wireless signal to significantly outperform 802.11g MIMO devices*
Sure looks like pre-N to me.