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mrmomaz
02-26-2007, 12:40 AM
I have created (IMAGE/PASTE) several partition images using BiNG and now I want to look at the files within them. I thought that TBIView.exe would do that, but TBIView needs a drive letter and I am unable to assign a drive letter to these images.

The images that I want to look at are on my HDD. Do I have to burn them to CD/DVD first? Where did I go wrong?

Paul Komski
02-26-2007, 05:06 AM
TBIview needs to be able to see the .img files which it then displays in an explorer view, when opened. If the partition or CD holding the file is inaccessible then the file is inaccessible. Either make the container visible or copy the img file to somewhere where you can see it.

Sylvander
02-26-2007, 07:25 AM
See the snapshot image 1 below.

TBIview has been installed on my Win2000Pro system and ".img" files ar registered to be handled by TBIview [as can be seen].
Right-click on an image file and the resulting "Context Menu" includes "Explore".
TBIview is what does the exploring of the image.
I notice a dll has been installed in a Windows system folder, and when I "Explore" an img file "Explorer.exe" runs a 2nd process [in addition the one already running] for a second or two [seen in Process Explorer].
The contents of the image file are then displayed by TBIview in something that looks very like Windows Explorer.

If the user right-clicks on an item [folder/file] a context menu offers "Explore" or "Extract" [as seen below].
You can navigate to any location in the folder/file system and choose to restore any number of "Objects" by extracting them to a location [that can be accessed by Windows] that you then specify [you will be given the opportunity to navigate to and choose].

"TBIView needs a drive letter and I am unable to assign a drive letter to these images"
a. No drive letter is needed. The img file should have been saved as a file with an img extension in a folder on some drive/partition that Windows can access.

b. The user should NOT attempt to assign a drive letter to the img files.

mrmomaz
02-26-2007, 08:44 AM
a. No drive letter is needed. The img file should have been saved as a file with an img extension in a folder on some drive/partition that Windows can access. This is my problem. I did the PASTE (of IMAGE/PASTE) to a free space area, not to a .IMG file. Thanks for the post.

Sylvander
02-26-2007, 12:52 PM
Paul would better understand I'm sure, but it sounds like you've copied the cluster-by-cluster contents of a partition, either to another partition, or as you say, some unallocated space.

So I wonder if you could save an image of those copied contents to an img file and save that to a folder on some partition.

mrmomaz
02-26-2007, 03:27 PM
Paul would better understand I'm sure, but it sounds like you've copied the cluster-by-cluster contents of a partition, either to another partition, or as you say, some unallocated space.
I don't know if BiNG copies it cluster by cluster or how, but BiNG writes it to an unallocated (free) space.(I used the BiNG option to creat an IMAGE of my partition and write it to another partition.) I'm getting the feeling that it needs to be on a DVD/CD media so it can have a drive letter to access it by. I don't really want to spend the time to do that, because I usually get errors when verifying DVD's from BiNG. Let's see what Paul has to say.. thanks for the post.

Sylvander
02-26-2007, 04:55 PM
"I'm getting the feeling that it needs to be on a DVD/CD media so it can have a drive letter to access it by"
I normally use "Image for DOS" to make image files, but I also have BiNG [never use it for making images], so I guess I could finally try it out and see how it makes an image to a file in a folder on a partition.

I could also perhaps image my 500 MB of used space on my 1 GB D: partition to a CD-RW disk.

Will get back after that's done.

Paul Komski
02-26-2007, 06:11 PM
If you choose unallocated space when choosing a location for an image of a partition made by BiNG then, (if there are at that time unused entries in the partition tables), BiNG creates a pseudo-partition of type DA and defined by a new primary partition table. {Not sure what it does with unallocated space in extended partitions but I guess its similar with the formation of a pseudo type DA logical partition}.

These "partitions" contain no boot code nor any file system. They are merely composed of some sectors containg BiNGs own image headers followd by the compressed data of the source partition. The only really recongisable things I have seen in them are normal looking FAT tables but in the wrong position alltogether.

Such "partitions" (file and header info) are invisible to everything except BiNG. This of course has both its advantages and disadvantages equivalent to a hidden Dell restore partiton on Dell systems.

Within BiNG you can only use these file-partitions to recreate a copy of the original partition in either unallocated space or by choosing and deleting another partition. You would choose image first and then paste. Using the copy command will just paste another copy of the file partition. On resoration the bytes are put back as they were beforehand.

I haven't tried pasting or copying to a CD/DVD but that could be interesting. So, as far as I can tell, if you want to access individual files and folders inside that image you must restore it as a proper partition first. The next time paste the image INTO A PARTITION and the resulting image file will be accessible by TBIview.

And by the way BiNG does copy sector by sector even if bits of them get left out when creating compressed images. The resored images should be (byte for byte) the same as the original.

Sylvander
02-26-2007, 07:29 PM
1. Booted the BiNG floppy.

2. "Setup [Cancel] | OK | Partition Work | Chose HD0 [to image] | highlighted my 1 GB D: partition holding 500 MB of personal data files | clicked the "Image" button | "Create Image" | OK | chose CDz [to save the image to my CD-drive] | highlighted "HP CD-Writer+ 9300" holding a blank CD-RW disk | paste | chose write speed [4x] | OK | Validate? [no] | "Imaging in progress" | Operation completed | OK | Esc | Reboot".

3. Booted back into Windows.

4. Started Windows explorer and displayed the content of the CD-RW disk. [see image 1]

5. See images 2 & 3 below for Exploring and Extracting.

6. I didn't see any way to specify a name for the img file. Is there a way?

Paul Komski
02-26-2007, 07:36 PM
There's no great need for a specific name for a file on a CD/DVD since only one image file per CD/DVD or set.

From BiNG pdf file

Create a compressed partition image
1 On the desktop, click Partition Work.
2 In the Partitions list, select the partition or volume that you want to create a compressed
image of, and then click Image under Actions.
3 In the Image dialog box, click Create Image to create a new image, and then click OK.
At the bottom of the Work with Partitions window, BootIt NG displays the Paste Pending
for Image Create message.
4 In the Partitions list, click the free-space entry, CD/DVD R/RW drive, NTFS or FAT/FAT32
partition or volume where you want to paste the copied partition image, and then click Paste
under Actions.
If you are pasting to a free-space volume and you use the same extended partition with
DOS/Win9x/WinME then, for correct operation of the OS, you must ensure that the last
volume in the extended partition is supported by the OS - i.e. FAT or FAT32.
DVD-RW discs must be new or fully blanked (not quick blanked) or the write process will fail.
5 Do one of the following:
• If you are pasting to a free-space entry, in the Paste Image dialog box under Partition
Information, type the Name of the partition that you want to create.
• If you are pasting to a CD or DVD drive, the image will span as many disks as needed.
• If you are pasting to an NTFS or FAT/FAT32 partition or volume, in the Save As dialog
box under File Name, type the name of the file to be created. This name must be 8 or less
characters with no spaces.
• If you are pasting to an NTFS or FAT/FAT32 partition or volume, BootIt NG lets you
adjust the file size being created so that you can copy the image files to a CD or DVD
using another program. If you don’t plan on copying the image files to a CD or DVD,
then it's best to limit the image files to 2 GB because 4 GB is only valid with certain
operating systems such as Windows NT, 2000, XP, and 2003.