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carrot
03-11-2007, 10:26 PM
I just bought a brand new computer (in parts) from newegg for someone. I got it and put the whole thing together and got it running. (after a million and 1 problems with faulty VGA's :mad:)
Anyway, I've been trying to install windows and get it all set up for my client, but I keep getting all these random BSOD.
I think in the past 8 hours I've re-installed windows 6 times. I have a feeling that means something is wrong on the hardware level.
Anyway, here are the windows stop messages I've been getting.

0x0000000A (0x0ED47688, 0x00000002, 0x00000001, 0x804ED5C6)

0x00000050 (0x9D9CA759, 0x00000001, 0xA72OD584, 0x00000000)
mrxdav.sys - Address A720D854 base at A720A000, Datestamp 3b7d83c

0x00000024 (0x001902FE, 0xF63DB388, 0xF63DB084, 0xF73D7FF8)
ntfs.sys


I think those are all the stop messages I've gotten so far. Now I just need to figure out what's causing them.
Could it be heat? Cause the case is open and the ambient room temp is like 95-100 degrees F. I have a fire burning over the weekend. :D

Thanks in advance!


Oops... I forgot to give you my system specs....

ASUS A8N5X Socket 939 NVIDIA nForce4 motherboard
AMD Athlon 64 4000+ San Diego 2.4GHz Socket 939 Processor OEM
SAPPHIRE 100165L Radeon X1650PRO 512MB GDDR2 PCI Express x16 Video Card
CORSAIR ValueSelect 1GB 184-Pin DDR 400 SDRAM
Thermaltake TR2 W0070RUC ATX 430W Power Supply
NEC 18X DVD±R DVD Burner 71701A-0B OEM
Western Digital Caviar SE 160GB SATA Hard Drive

It's Windows XP Home that is giving me all the grief.

ski
03-12-2007, 10:16 AM
Start troubleshooting here(0x0000000A BSOD):
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314063

carrot
03-12-2007, 08:26 PM
Thanks, I read that, but didn't really understand it. Could some one explain to me? :D

carrot
03-13-2007, 01:10 AM
I just got ANOTHER death screen.
I'm getting really angry at this computer now, especially since it's for someone else and they are getting impatient.

0x0000007F

Sylvander
03-13-2007, 03:36 AM
Can you get this [or ANY other fairly recent Windows] OS running long enough to run Windows XP Upgrade Advisor (http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/upgrading/advisor.mspx)?

The report generated by that would probably tell you which item[s] of hardware/software is/are incompatible with XP [and causing this problem?]

Sylvander
03-13-2007, 04:25 AM
Wondering whether "XP Upgrade Advisor" could be run from a bootable CD...

Doesn't look like it. :(

I downloaded the file and gave it a home on a USB drive [HDD, but it could have been a "Flash Drive"], and ran the file from there using Win2000Pro.

It extracted lots of folders/files.
"PrevX" warned me that...
Prog: "wextract-cleanup0"
Had registered an executable to run at Startup, as follows:
rundll32.exe C:\Windows\System32\advpack.dll, delnoderundll32
"C:\Docume~1\[username]\Locals~1\Temp\IXP000.tmp\"

Looks like Windows is needed for this to be run.

Paul Komski
03-13-2007, 04:37 AM
Is this WinXP Home SP2 or an earlier version and have you ever been on-line and if so by what method?

BSODs can be notoriously difficult to pin down at times since they can be software or hardware induced. If you have not yet installed any software then an incompatible piece of hardware or an inappropriate hardware driver is probably the culprit.

An additional problem is that, whatever the primary fault was, the improper shutdowns themselves can generate (even on ntfs partitions) additional BSODs due to file system corruption; this is probably the cause of the ntfs.sys related BSOD. You probably need to run chkdsk /f from a command prompt whenever the faults appear after a clean install.

Suggest you make a small, say 5gig ntfs partition at the start of the drive and an equivalent partition at the end of the drive. Clean install and then immediately make an image file of your C drive onto the second partition. With a fast modern system like yours you can then very rapidly go back to the point in time when the image was made and get a reproducible file system after every restore. With a small partition it would also be quick to do any chkdsk operations. It is easy enough to expand the partions later using BiNG (in my sig) or equivalent.

Assuming there is no third-party software installed (including drivers) then bad RAM, a bad HDD or an inappropriate BIOS setting would be three common contenders.

Test the memory or swap in just one new stick. I have seen SATAs produce problems on certain boards but not on an Asus A8NE cousin of your board. Still it could be worth trying an IDE drive just for troubleshooting purposes.

Reset the CMOS to defaults and make sure no caching is enabled. Etc, etc. Good luck and as a last resort try another board.

PS Doubt if its heat related but check the temps in the BIOS setup and ensure you are not overclocking.

BTW http://support.microsoft.com/kb/137539


This error message can occur if either of the following conditions exists:
• Your computer has hardware or software problems (hardware failure is the most common cause).
• You try to over clock the speed of your computer's processor (for example, you set a 150 MhZ processor to run at 187 MhZ).

The most common causes of a STOP 0x7F are:
• Low-level hardware corruption, such as corrupt memory (RAM)
• Mismatched memory modules
• A malfunctioning motherboard

carrot
03-13-2007, 06:13 PM
Is this WinXP Home SP2 or an earlier version and have you ever been on-line and if so by what method?


Windows XP Home. I have two CD's (I've treid both, same problems) one with SP2 on it and one without.
Yes, i've been online. It was through a LAN, but only after installing the drivers for the ethernet port.


Suggest you make a small, say 5gig ntfs partition at the start of the drive and an equivalent partition at the end of the drive. Clean install and then immediately make an image file of your C drive onto the second partition. With a fast modern system like yours you can then very rapidly go back to the point in time when the image was made and get a reproducible file system after every restore. With a small partition it would also be quick to do any chkdsk operations. It is easy enough to expand the partions later using BiNG (in my sig) or equivalent.




Sorry, but I don't really understand this, could you explain it?

Thanks!
Chandler

Paul Komski
03-13-2007, 06:46 PM
It was through a LAN, but only after installing the drivers for the ethernet port.
Suggest that you just run windows for a while without going on line or installing any drivers; (and where did the drivers come from?). Point is to exclude everything that is not installed from the CD so that if the BSODs dont appear it begins to point to installed software, including 3rd Party Drivers.


Sorry, but I don't really understand this, could you explain it?Basically install to a small partition rather than use the whole hard drive since running utilities etc etc will be much faster. This also gives the option to create a second partition for storing an image file on. Image files could also be stored on a CD/DVD. Programs like BiNG (in my sig) can do such partitioning and imaging.

The concept of making an image file (an archived clone of the whole of the partition) is that it allows you to keep a copy of your system "frozen in time". That image can be restored so that the PC becomes just as it was at the moment the image was made. This has a number of uses, one of which is to enable one to experiment and still go back to where one was before the "experiment" (eg installation of device driver) took place.

carrot
03-13-2007, 11:42 PM
I can pretty much guarantee it's not software related.
I was reinstalling windows (for the bloody hundred-thousandth time!) and I had to leave to go somewhere. I had already passed the window where you enter your key, already restarted, already gone through the "Let's set up windows" page. I was just about to get to the desktop (I think) when I had to leave. Anyway, I came back a few hours later... BOOM! BSOD. I don't know how exactly the BSOD showed, I hadn't changed the setting to not automatically restart, but oh well.
So ya, I didn't so much as move the mouse after a clean install and I got a death screen.
It was the 0x0000000A type.
So, now that we know (or at least, I assume we know...) that it's hardware related, what is the best way to go about testing each component? The only thing I can think of that will get the job done fast enough (and it needs to be fixed soon) is paying 60 bucks and having the Geek Squad do it. (Man, I HATE the geek squad...)

Thanks for all the help you've given so far, you guys are great!

Sylvander
03-14-2007, 04:35 AM
"I was just about to get to the desktop...BOOM! BSOD"
Don't know if it's the same with newer versions of Windows, but with older versions...
If this was at the point where Windows Setup had restarted to "initialise" the hardware...
If there are no suitable drivers available for an item of hardware, and it cannot be initialised...
And Setup "stops responding"...
The user was [is?] expected to SWITCH OFF THE PC...
Then switch back on and resume Setup.
Setup will detect that there was a problem with an item of hardware [info on that is saved in a file that Setup reads] and skip the initialisation of that item.
Every instance of a falure to initialise is dealt with in the same way until all items are initialised and those that cannot be initialised are skipped.
Those skipped items will show as having a problem in Device Manager.

Another way to deal with the problem is to leave the problem items of hardware unconnected.

"XP Upgrade Advisor" would presumably report the problem hardware.

Paul Komski
03-14-2007, 05:22 AM
Here's a couple of threads from the THG Forums that might give you a couple of ideas (including trying a different CD). I would particularly look at the BIOS settings and read the manual thoroughly with respect to configuring the SATA. Or temp try out a PATA to see if that might narrow things down.

http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/P5B-deluxe-BSOD-winxp-install-ftopict220988.html
http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/P5WD2-giving-BSOD-Win-XP-installation-ftopict184828.html

carrot
03-14-2007, 10:11 PM
I just turned the computer on again. You're right Sylvander, when I turned it on, it said "Resuming Setup" and kept on installing windows. Odd though, because I haven't installed any new hardware, just what has been in there the whole time. Oh well.
Also, I just tried the Windows XP Upgrade Advisor. I copied it via a USB stick so I wouldn't have to install even the LAN driver. It reported that everything was all fine and dandy.

Here's a little piece of info that might help, might not mean anything:
I had HUGE problems with the graphics card before. This new problem is making me mad because, it worked before. I got all the parts from Newegg, put it together, installed windows, and had tons of stuff working. I even left it on overnight a few times. Heck, I had even installed and was playing Quake 4. (The things I do on clients computers....) Then all of a sudden the display wigged out. I tested the card over and over and found out that it was in "Perfect Working Order." Other than the fact that I couldn't read the screen because it was a screwey. I could still semi-see what was going on. Anyway, I RMA'd it. The replacement arrived, and I stuck it in the computer. Yay, it worked. Then I reset the computer. And it broke AGAIN! This time the display was completely blank though. So I RMA'd it AGAIN (Newegg was incredibly helpful at this point. They RMA'd it for a refund and had me buy a new one with free shipping, upgraded to overnight.) This was the 3rd card I'd had for this computer. Ugh. But, it's in there and it's working.
The thing I thought might affect stuff was that when I was trying to fix the multiple broken cards, I turned it on and off a whole bunch of times without any regard for the power button. I just used the PSU switch.

Thanks again!
Chandler

Edit: I almost forgot. I tried an IDE hard drive. The only one I had was like 5 GB but I wiped it and installed windows. When I was trying to upgrade to SP2, it BSOD'd me.

Sylvander
03-15-2007, 04:53 AM
"when I turned it on, it said "Resuming Setup" and kept on installing windows"
So perhaps it had skipped the initialisation of an item of hardware...
Because there was no driver for that item included on the Windows CD.
Perhaps previously the driver for that item had been supplied from some other source?
How do things look in Device Manager?
Any devices not working?

"just tried the Windows XP Upgrade Advisor...It reported that everything was all fine and dandy"
Well that's good to know.
So there are no incompatibilities...
But that doesn't mean all drivers have been installed and all hardware items are functioning.
Again...
Perhaps there was a driver needed for an item of hardware, but your Windows CD doesn't include that particular driver.

Paul Komski
03-15-2007, 05:31 AM
Since it happens with both PATA and SATA then, bad memory aside, the mobo itself must be suspect - at the very least. Could be worth flashing but personally I would be looking for an RMA.

carrot
03-18-2007, 09:47 PM
Sorry, I didn't realize there had been any new posts. :)

When I look in the device manager all the hardware items are 'working.' A big bunch of them have ? next to the name, but I just assume that's because I haven't installed the drivers yet.

I really don't want it to be the mobo... That would suck really really bad. Oh well.

Right now I'm trying a new generic VGA just in case, but if it still gives me a problem, I'm RMA'ing the mobo, memory, VGA, and possibly the HDD.
Maybe newegg will be really nice and give me overnight shipping for free again... One can only hope...
For replacements, should I buy all the same parts, get an entire new selection (I'm keeping the CPU, so I still have to have a socket 939 mobo), or just switch out one or two parts?

You know, maybe I'll just RMA it all anyway, just to be on the safe side....

Sylvander
03-19-2007, 04:13 AM
This fortnight/fourteen-night "Computeractive magazine has an article on problem solving that includes...

1. Yellow exclamation mark = Conflict with another hardware device; will not work properly.

2. Red X = Device has been removed or disabled or cannot be located by Windows.

3. Other Devices = Cannot be identified by Windows; no drivers loaded, will not function.

Description of Green Question Mark in Device Manager
This indicates that an exact (device-specific) driver is not available, and that a compatible driver has been installed.
Some loss of functionality may occur with some devices. (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/275012)