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Marc
11-13-2000, 11:09 PM
Hello everyone, I am new to the board. I do have a major love for technology and computers. I currently am a government employee. I seek to go into the IT field. I believe that this certification will give me the chance to get my foot in the door. I don't have a ton of computer repair experience. I have some knowledge. The course is offered here in a 5 day 40 hour crash course and then the exam. I am wondering if I can learn all of this info in 5 days? My goal is to obtain this, get in the IT door of my job and then learn on the job. If I can pass this test, does this sound like a decent plan?? I mean in all honesty, how much will I really obtain in a 5 day crash course??

Thanks, Marc

Paleo Pete
11-13-2000, 11:46 PM
Not sure how good a 5 day crash course would be, judguing by the A+ study guides I have I'd be a bit leary about trying to learn enough to pass the test that quick. Maybe if you already have a solid background in computers...

My advice would be to search the local resale shops, flea markets and garage sales for cheap obsolete computers to practice on, try and build/rebuild a few 386/486 machines, and see how much you can learn in the process. Nothing like hands-on experience...

Also while you're in the resale shops, grab every book in sight that has anything to do with computer repair, DOS, Windows, etc. and become a regular fixture in your local library. Learn DOS and Windows 9x inside out.

After you spend 6 months to a year reading and working on every older computer you can find, you might be able to take the 5 day course and pass the test, with the backup of all the things you pick up when you have to actually make a few dead computers work. You start to remember standard IRQ addresses, fdisk/format procedure, installation procedures, common errors etc.

If you try the 5 day course without some background, all I can say is you'd better have a real good memory...

Oh...the PC Guide forums often have lots of info that will help, I learn TONS from both trying to answer questions and reading the replies other people post. I sometimes spend over a half hour digging through links on a search engine for a hint about a certain problem. You'd never believe the info I come across in the process.

Also you can use the search engines to find brain dumps and other A+ test info.

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If you had everything...Where would you put it?

Computer Information Links (http://www.geocities.com/paleopete/)

the diff
11-14-2000, 11:24 PM
Just from a novice point of view, in regards to the 5 day course...

I reinforce what Mr. P noted to you! IF, you have a REAL solid PC repair background, you may feel comfortable enough to slap down your $200+ for the exams.

I'd make sure the course you are taking provides some sample examine guestions so you can measure what you know/learned agains what you need to know to pass the two exams.

Another suggestion, get your hands on one of the A+ Certiciation books (Check local library or inter-library loan) or go to the internet and find some of the sites that provide some sample tests. If you need some help here let us know.

Good luck!

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= diff =

amateur
11-15-2000, 06:13 AM
check this site :

www.cron.edu.sg/public/training/default.asp (http://www.cron.edu.sg/public/training/default.asp)


look up " PC Hardware and Software Technical Training "

if u can find a course like this where u are then its
worth it. they not only have theory lessons but lots
of hands-on practice using as many as 3 PCs for every
student.

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trying to be a computer geek http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/cool.gif

[This message has been edited by amateur (edited 11-15-2000).]

[This message has been edited by amateur (edited 11-15-2000).]

Hippo
11-19-2000, 10:36 PM
I took a crash course 5 day 40 hour and passed the exams pretty highly. However before I had done that I tried a course over the internet which sent a cd and people online to help with questions, and had no success. So for me only I believe that if comparible to your offer then that crash course is better. But for me the A+ cert. has done nothing except allowed me to fix family and friends computers, because noone in my area of the world wants a certified-without experience person. Good luck to you.

JLee
11-23-2000, 11:14 AM
Originally posted by Marc:
Hello everyone, I am new to the board. I do have a major love for technology and computers. I currently am a government employee. I seek to go into the IT field. I believe that this certification will give me the chance to get my foot in the door. I don't have a ton of computer repair experience. I have some knowledge. The course is offered here in a 5 day 40 hour crash course and then the exam. I am wondering if I can learn all of this info in 5 days? My goal is to obtain this, get in the IT door of my job and then learn on the job. If I can pass this test, does this sound like a decent plan?? I mean in all honesty, how much will I really obtain in a 5 day crash course??

Thanks, Marc

JLee
11-23-2000, 11:25 AM
AS far as getting certified in 5 days, I suggest taking a home course for a class a+ certification.
I'm taking a course from Harcourt learning direct which i will be finishing in the next two months that will give me a class a+ certification.
This course is very detailed in every thing you need to know to get started in a job or your own venture.
It takes a year or so to complete but it would do you a world of good to get the knowlege.

xor_chad
11-25-2000, 05:59 PM
I would have to say NO. What these 5 day courses are designed around is getting you to pass the exam and thats it. I have taken 3 month courses and Still find myself feeling unsatisfied with what was covered. It takes lots of experience and lots of research to become proficent. If you truely have a desire for this stuff i suggest readind the PC Guide straight thru. It is a superb source of information. I espically love the section on Hard Drives. 5 days is nothing...its definately more than 40hrs tho. IF you did nothing but research and tinker for 5 days on end, you WOULD learn alot...or go insane. I would say pass on the course untill you are ready to take the exam.

Its a 5 day exam prep thats all.

I cant tell you the number of ppl in this field that are A+ or ANY other certification that have NO business touching PC's...i see them getting fired all the time http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif!

If you really have a passion then stick with it and give it time. Its not going anywhere! Later...
Later...

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Chad Wilson
C++/ASM Programmer
PC Support Technician

bt
11-25-2000, 10:24 PM
Hello Everyone,

I went throught the A+ Course and MCSE training. I never would have made it without the help of this site:
http://www.leuthard.com

It has the practice tests, comments from people just taking the tests, etc.

I came out of the classes with alot of BOOK SMARTS but not alot of hands on. I agree it is great to find a 386/486 computer to take apart at home and find one to set up a network at home. Labs in class are not real world.

bt

[This message has been edited by bt (edited 11-25-2000).]

NewBritG44
12-15-2000, 12:50 PM
The best advice I will give is practice, practice, practice. Take a computer apart, put it together, take it apart again, put it back together again until you can do it in your sleep!!!!!!. Even if you take the 5 day course and pass it to me all you would really have is head knowledge. If your turned a computer on and you have a blank screen would you know what to do? WOuld you really know how to format a hard drive? Really give it some consideration and thought before you invest your hard earned money into the test.
Just giving my 1 cent worth!!!

kenja
12-25-2000, 05:39 AM
Don't stop at just the A+ certificate, folks! The CompTIA Network+ certificate is also worthwhile. If you have any aspirations to do the MCSE (Windows 2000 track), Microsoft assumes you already know all this stuff. (Well, maybe not ALL of it!)

Neovox
12-28-2000, 07:46 PM
I teach a hands-on style A+ Cert course. It's two evenings per week, 3.5 hours each evening, for four weeks. I have had both students with previous experience and students who have only used their computer as a work processor. I have found that our course works very well for those who have at least a little bit of experience, like installing an operating system or upgrading hardware. It tends to overwhelm those who have not yet gotten that far. Because of this, our organization allows students to re-sit a course as many times as they like for up to one year--I really nice option. Hope this helps.

Watch out for those places that offer to teach you everything in a weekend. The are designed for people who have the experience and just need a crash course to get an idea of what is on the exam. Try to get someting that offers hands-on training. I know of one nationally-based company whose name I will not mention, whose teachers just read to the students right out of the text.

Be carefull. There are a lot of training scams out there.

clancem
01-18-2001, 10:12 PM
Marc,

I'm studying for A+ also using Exam Cram book and CD. They make no bones about it, the materials are to help you pass the test. But the nature of hardware/system work seems very hands-on anyway. The majority of learning will be done in the field, on the job. A+ cert. just gets you in the door.

No doubt its a lot of material to absorb. You can cover it in 5 days, but do you know it? Will you remember it? My understanding is the two tests are rather tricky. I know I'll be taking several practice tests before I plunk down my $256. Good Luck. BC

Ken Thomas
01-19-2001, 04:46 PM
Hello everyone,
I've been visiting this site for several months now. I have visited most of the topics and visit other areas of the PC Guide often. I am pursuing the A+ certification, and will sit for the exam Feb 21,2001. I have not been an IT professional, but was involved with a career in the Air Force as an electronic technician for some 18 yrs. I've been on the user end of PCs since the early 80s, and worked with digital to analog equipment from 1962 thru 1981 at which time I retired from the Air Force. At any rate, this is a career switch for me. I'm interested in any advice anyone might offer regarding making it a successful career switch. I have read and re-read both Michael Myers (All-In-One A+ Certification), and Jean Andrews (Exam Prep A+ *Adaptive Testing Edition*). I suppose my major concern is the hands on type experience. I do have two Pentium IIs available for hands on (of course these aren't on the exam to a large degree), and also one old Pentium 133, and I have an Ethernet hub for setting up a network. I would appreciate any information regarding specific "hands on" type configurations (things *smile*), I might do to prepare for the A+ exam. I also plan to follow on with the Network+ exam and onto the MCSE. I'd be appreciative of any suggestions in making this a success story. Sorry for the long windedness, I'll be less wordy in the future. Thanks. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif

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*If you don't grow, your 'status quo'."

kenja
01-20-2001, 01:33 AM
IMO: Wordiness is only a problem if one has nothing to say. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif

You may be overestimating the difficulty of the A+ exam. I don't know about the newly revised tests; seemed like an easy pass to me (but I've been sporadically involved with "microcomputers" since 1975). I thought the Network+ exam was fair; my only preparation was the Syngress box set, and I never even looked at the companion volume of Q & A. (Did have some exposure to networks in an industrial workplace, but nothing directly related to the exam objectives.)

I really didn't want to be the first to say this in the forum, but I see "leuthard" has been mentioned in this thread; If you just want to pass the elementary exams, study the "brain dumps". Several of the answers given are wrong, but many people have blatantly violated the nondisclosure agreement they signed before taking an exam. Every single question on the 70-215 (W2k server) exam I sat for last week was listed on the dumps.

I didn't know brain dumps even existed until I began studying for the W2k MCSE. I've bought a bunch of W2k study guides, and they all seem to parrot the Microsoft PR about "Raising the bar" and "You wont be able to brain dump for these exams!" (as opposed to the (retiring) NT4 tests). Bullsh http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/redface.gif http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/redface.gif !

That seems to only hold true for the W2k "Designing..." exams; they are reportedly three-hour case study monsters. Only one is required, but I'm going to try to do all three (I enjoy a challenge).

I didn't even bother searching for braindumps until three days before sitting for the 70-210 (Professional). After the test, I felt like a fool. I could have easily passed it two months before. Then again, in terms of the real world, over-preparation is rarely a bad thing. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif

There is an incredible amount of overlap among the W2k MCSE "core four" exams. I highly recommend Alan Carter's "Windows 2000 MCSE Study System" (ISBN 0-7645-4701-1). The whole ball of wax, in a single volume (you'll want supplementary material for the 70-216 and 70-217). I'm currently studying for the "Network Infrastructure Administration" test; having absorbed a fair quantity of the Network+ objectives makes things seem very familiar.

Your three-computer network will be a sufficient training lab for the MCSE if you have at least 64MB for Professional and 128MB for the servers. I got so tired of all the page file activity for even simple tasks on my 200MHz Pentium Dell (chipset limited to 64MB) that I sold it and "rolled my own" AMD-based machine.

Wish you the best of luck in your quest for success, but you're obviously aware that we make most of our luck ourselves http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/wink.gif .

Ken Thomas
01-20-2001, 01:31 PM
Oh my, all that typing, and a wrong user name,,,argg,,oh well ,,,argg,,,third attempt

Hey kenja,

Thanks so very much for your speedy and thorough reply. It did present me with a couple more questions if you don't mind. I have several Microsoft books on the Win2K track, however, upon reading (again) the reviews on them at amazon.com, I have decided I need some more help.

I will be ordering the book by Carter within the week, people really reinforced what you had said about his book. And although I have several other microsoft books in the order of MCSE Training Kit, those reviews did not fair well. Do you have any suggestions regarding material related to the 70-216 and 70-217 exams?

Again, thanks for your help and using your time to help me and others.

Hey Paleo, I apoligize in advance if I have placed this in the wrong category. I was hoping the Win2K information was't to far off with my ealier comments regarding the A+ certification. At any rate, thanks for the great job you and the others do in helping us struggle through this maze.

Everyone have a nice day...
http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif

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"If you don't grow, your 'status quo'."

kenja
01-20-2001, 11:20 PM
Well, my short answer for 70-216 preparation would be: I like the Syngress study guide (ISBN 0-07-212383-4) and the W2k networking disk currently still available at Fatbrain.com (under "Training and Certification", "SmartForce Past Promotions").

For my looong answer, please see my "MCSE.." post in this forum. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif

steveo
04-18-2001, 06:59 PM
As far as the five day course goes, there's a lot of info to cram in very short time. Anybody with little knowledge in this field will be lost and the exams will be tough. For myself, I had about 3 years of tinkering with pc's but nothing serious. I decided to take the course but found I was the only student in class. This helped a lot. Also the school was going through a transition period so my class was stretched out to about 35 days. I also spent about 3 hours a night going over material and using the internet for additional information. I took many sample tests and chatted with a few techs about questions I had. I finally wrote both exams and failed the dos, so I had to write it again and passed. Even with all the prep work I found the tests to be tough but I did get a tech job the next day so there was a good payoff to the work I put in.

Patrick
04-20-2001, 01:08 PM
Originally posted by Ken Thomas:
Hello everyone,
I've been visiting this site for several months now. I have visited most of the topics and visit other areas of the PC Guide often. I am pursuing the A+ certification, and will sit for the exam Feb 21,2001. I have not been an IT professional, but was involved with a career in the Air Force as an electronic technician for some 18 yrs. I've been on the user end of PCs since the early 80s, and worked with digital to analog equipment from 1962 thru 1981 at which time I retired from the Air Force. At any rate, this is a career switch for me. I'm interested in any advice anyone might offer regarding making it a successful career switch. I have read and re-read both Michael Myers (All-In-One A+ Certification), and Jean Andrews (Exam Prep A+ *Adaptive Testing Edition*). I suppose my major concern is the hands on type experience. I do have two Pentium IIs available for hands on (of course these aren't on the exam to a large degree), and also one old Pentium 133, and I have an Ethernet hub for setting up a network. I would appreciate any information regarding specific "hands on" type configurations (things *smile*), I might do to prepare for the A+ exam. I also plan to follow on with the Network+ exam and onto the MCSE. I'd be appreciative of any suggestions in making this a success story. Sorry for the long windedness, I'll be less wordy in the future. Thanks. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif



Why you can probably start up a niche on your own or within a business catering to the internet needs(mind the expression) other retired folks. Pretty sure there a plenty of elder folks who want to learn the ways of the new world from someone they can understand then some 10 year old brat that knows everything


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PIII 600Mhz/98se
576MB Ram/20G Maxtor
Ricoh 12-6-4 SCSI/SB Live Platinum
Cable/Advance 5e by via

Ken Thomas
04-20-2001, 04:59 PM
Thanks Patrick, that's a very good suggestion, and I'll check it out.

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"If you don't stretch and grow, your 'status quo'."

Wretched_0ne
05-04-2001, 08:56 PM
Those one week courses are really gimmicks. They shouldn't be pushing newbies in to those. The only peeps that type of class was ever ment for were experienced technicians who needed preping for the exams.

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Wretched

wiltrot
06-19-2001, 03:27 PM
I don't know about that A+ course at Harcourt Learning Direct. It's only
a preparation for the A+ exam. You pay them almost $400 for the course and
then you pay CompTIA $265 for the exam. Why not just go to the local book
store and buy A+ Complete Study Guide Second Edition by David Groth & Dan
Newland for $50. And you can get the A+ Complete Lab Manual Second Edition
by Donald R. Evans for $20. It covers objectives for the core hardware and operatingsystems technologies exams with over 40 labs designed to accompany the A+Complete Study Guide. Regardless which direction you take you will pay CompTIA for the exam. Besides, I inquired at Harcourt about
the course and it's based on the 98 exam which is discontinued. It's been
a month or two since I inquired, they could have updated. There's alot of
information out there that doesn't cost alot of money or none at all. But
it will cost you time, alot of time. Anyway, that's my 2 cents worth.