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Vic 970
09-30-2001, 03:13 PM
is A+ the place to start? I have several certs obtained from local college, spreadsheets,databases,wordprocessor, etc. and with a lot of help from this forum have done some successfull pc tinkering as well. I would now like to learn more about maintainance & repair inc. dos.

I have had a look at the online courses mentioned on this forum & the A+ dos looks good to me.

Would you suggest that I start here? and give me an idea of how long on average the course would take, I know it depends on a lot of variables, but some idea would be useful, and what of obtaining a cert at the end. (hopefully)

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for every question there's an answer. Then a load more questions.

Regards..,
Vic.

geebee76
09-30-2001, 04:39 PM
Hi Vic,

The best advice I could give you would be to start by reading the PC Guide thoroughly. I spent two months in there only occasionaly coming up for air. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/biggrin.gif.
I think this will give you a seriously good grounding in all aspects of PC's. Although it very easy reading, it does go into some very technical areas. I could imagine many seasoned pros using it for reference purposes.

The next step, which is where I'm at, is to follow this Forum religiously.
Follow the threads, read the advice and do plenty of your own research.
When a question comes up, go off and try to solve it yourself. The experts here will generally always beat you to the answer but you will learn so much from the experience.

The next step is to get a good A+ book, I'm using Mike Meyers 3rd Edition.
Again, read it from front to back.

As you said, there are lot of variables involved, which will ultimately govern how long it will take. Some people learn faster than others and some people are more driven than others.

If you have basic knowledge of computing, then I would think that a year of serious study will more than prepare you for A+, the first rung on the ladder to geekdom http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

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You are making progress if each mistake is a new one!

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geebee76@hotmail.com

Vic 970
09-30-2001, 05:43 PM
Thanks geebee, I have ordered the PC guide on disc & have been looking at some of the study courses & practice exams from links posted in the forums.
12 months of hard study is what I anticipated. & your advice about trying to solve the problems which come up on this forum is very good. I have actually done that with some posts, but only with simple things which attracted my interest, I will accept your advice & take it more seriously from now on.

Re: the exam, can you tell me where you can take it etc.?

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for every question there's an answer. Then a load more questions.

Regards..,
Vic.

Pianorak
09-30-2001, 05:53 PM
To amplify Geebees' advice: Meyers' suggests you devote this much time studying for the A+ Certification exams:
Amount of Experience installing cards, printers, modems etc. etc.
None - 130 hours
Quite a Bit - 33 hours
and anything in between accordingly.
Plus the following hours based on number of months of direct, professional experience in supporting PCs:
0 Add 50 hrs
Up to 6 Add 20 hrs
6-12 Add 10 hrs
12+ Add 0 hrs.

This should give you a rough idea.

Paleo Pete
09-30-2001, 11:28 PM
All of the above is sound advice, I would also recommend finding inexpensive used computers and rebuilding them as well. Swap parts, find out what makes them tick, put them back together and make them work. Older ones as well. The more you physically apply what you study, the better understanding of it you'll have. Definitely try to find an old XT that runs DOS only, or a couple, and make them run. Some of the toughest troubleshooting I've done was on those old dinosaurs...

Check with local community colleges for tests, they shoiuld know where, if they don't actually do the testing. Local adult education organizations might know too.

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geebee76
10-01-2001, 02:50 PM
Hi Vic,

Forgot about the "getting your hands dirty part". If you follow Pete's advice you will definitely gain a better understanding.

Go to this Test Center Locator (http://www.comptia.org/log/test_location.cfm?&newlink=prometric) and type in a few details to find most of the test centers in the UK (or anywhere else).

Good Luck http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/smile.gif

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You are making progress if each mistake is a new one!

Sig from Here (http://www.oneliners-and-proverbs.com/)

geebee76@hotmail.com

Vic 970
10-01-2001, 04:00 PM
Thanks all. what do I need besides a screwdriver, multimeter, soldering iron & an understanding wife?

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for every question there's an answer. Then a load more questions.

Regards..,
Vic.

YODA74
10-01-2001, 07:53 PM
Money http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

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What have I gotten my self Into now (ROFLMAO)

lysdexia
10-03-2001, 01:10 AM
A lot of time and an even temper. A spare to smash when you lose it!! Seriously tho, Scott Mueller's guide to Repairing and Upgrading PC's is an excellent reference book with lots of invaluable charts and tables, and comes with a video which shows how to install many components.

lysdexia
10-03-2001, 01:12 AM
A lot of time and an even temper. A spare to smash when you lose it!! Seriously tho, Scott Mueller's guide to Repairing and Upgrading PC's is an excellent reference book with lots of invaluable charts and tables, and comes with a video which shows how to install many components.

lysdexia
10-03-2001, 01:14 AM
A lot of time and an even temper. A spare to smash when you lose it!! Seriously tho, Scott Mueller's guide to Repairing and Upgrading PC's is an excellent reference book with lots of invaluable charts and tables, and comes with a video which shows how to install many components.

lysdexia
10-03-2001, 01:23 AM
A lot of time and an even temper. A spare to smash when you lose it!! Seriously tho, Scott Mueller's guide to Repairing and Upgrading PC's is an excellent reference book with lots of invaluable charts and tables, and comes with a video which shows how to install many components.

lysdexia
10-03-2001, 01:27 AM
A lot of time and an even temper. A spare to smash when you lose it!! Seriously tho, Scott Mueller's guide to Repairing and Upgrading PC's is an excellent reference book with lots of invaluable charts and tables, and comes with a video which shows how to install many components.

darm
10-03-2001, 07:20 AM
Originally posted by Vic 970:
Thanks all. what do I need besides a screwdriver, multimeter, soldering iron & an understanding wife?



Where do you get the understanding wife from?

Pianorak
10-03-2001, 04:04 PM
<<Where do you get the understanding wife from?>>

Google? Seems to have the answer to most things. http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

Vic 970
10-03-2001, 05:11 PM
Exactly. I'll do a Google search right away.

Thanks for all the input.

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for every question there's an answer. Then a load more questions.

Regards..,
Vic.

lysdexia
10-04-2001, 01:11 PM
OMG!! Sorry for the multiple posts! Thought they werent getting through so I gave up!!

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ya think?

iisbob
10-06-2001, 07:03 AM
..understanding wife..


A Definate must have!! http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/biggrin.gif I would also recommend a good micro-mag flash light, plenty of cable ties, and a hammer.

The hammer is for pounding the crap out of the 'puter when it refuses to acknowledge your superior intellect and skills. http://community.theunderdogs.org/smiley/misc/disturbed.gif

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iisbob
"Ward, come upstairs and talk to The Beaver."
-- June (Mrs. Frisky) Cleaver

kenja
10-08-2001, 08:08 PM
Additions to tool list: Needle nose pliers (for jumpers). The only occasion I've had to solder on a PC has been splicing wires, so get a decent wire stripper; I prefer this style (http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?&DID=7&User_ID=3104855&st=5475&st2=-65745396&st3=-55728492&Product_ID=10382&CATID=54).

Vic 970
10-09-2001, 04:46 PM
Thanks. Just waiting on the post for my PC guide disc now.

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for every question there's an answer. Then a load more questions.

Regards..,
Vic.

HewittC4
05-13-2002, 11:27 PM
I would suggest an grounding strap. I have know too many people (myself included) that has ruined their computer guts because they weren't grounded.

Sylvor
05-27-2002, 12:06 PM
Big pair of rubber gloves

"About 6 years ago I was testing a floppy drive in an old bare-bones test system I had, I held the power switch in one hand (it was no longer connected to the case) and was holding the floppy in the other, I pressed the switch in - not realising that the ruber boot had slipped back and got a nasty electric shock. My hand was burnt where it touched the contacts and I broke one of my fingers while electro-squeezing the floppy drive. I was thrown against the wall - all the while screaming in a note I didn't even know I could reach. Now I am receeding and have a fear of floppy drives... don't be like me, wear rubber"


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Sly :)

"Helping everyday people with everyday problems, everyday!"

"The ability to quote is a serviceable substitute for wit"

ranchdog
05-27-2002, 01:48 PM
Did it Frizzie your hair? http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/eek.gif

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....How long is a minute... depends on which side of the Bathroom door you're on. ......
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old_kid
06-02-2002, 10:23 AM
Sheeeshh - where did you find that rarest of all jewels - an understanding wife?!?!?!?!!?

Next thing you know someone will start claiming that pigs can fly

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Old dogs CAN learn new tricks

pentachris
06-03-2002, 08:12 PM
If you've studied your Floyd properly, you'll know that pigs can fly.

http://www.PCGuide.com/ubb/cool.gif

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Some mistakes are too much fun to make only once.