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gardeness
10-03-2000, 06:54 PM
My system consistantly has problems with running out of resources, especially after playing games on the net or loading a lot of pages. It seemed better after I ran nortons utilities stuff, but now it is having problems again. I am wondering if my memory is bad, even though nortons says its ok - I wonder because I show that I have 196megs, which breaks down as such: 128megs, 32megs, and ???? 36 megs on the 64 meg stick???

Could it be a bad stick, or maybe just not seated properly??

Bmcdanold
10-03-2000, 09:17 PM
Where are you getting the memory figure from? If its from the memory check when you turn your computer on, it probably says something like 196608K which may look like 196mb, but is actually 192. (192mb x 1024k/mb = 196608k) That would seem correct. But you say you have a 128mb, 64mb and a 32mb...hmmm that should be 224... Im wondering if the 32mb stick isn't the same spec or maybe it is actually the defective one. Check and make sure every stick is either ECC (Error correction checking i think is what it means) or Non-ECC. Also check the frequency of all the sticks. Make sure that none are too fast for your motherboard. ie putting pc133mhz in a board that only takes up to pc100. Usually memory will downclock but not always. And yes...check how well they are seated in the slots. DIMMS can sometimes get stuck and look like they are in when they really are not. And one other thing to check is the nanosecond response for each stick. Every once in a while mixing different speed ram doesn't always work. Good luck! (128,64 and 32?? 224mb? what a wierd number, i guess i had 44mb once... 16,16,8,4)

Paleo Pete
10-03-2000, 10:26 PM
The problem with it not showing the correct memory might be simpler than you think...Some motherboards will not recognize double sided memory, only single sided. Also might be a bad 32MB chip. Try each chip by itself. See how each acts. Windows also has a problem with more than 128MB memory, according to what I've seen posted here & there on the net. You might drop it back to 128 and see how it works.

As mentioned above, check the access time, they shouldn't be mixed. In most cases PC 133 will work fine at slower speeds, 133MHz is the fastest it will run, not the only speed it will run. Also check to see if you might be mixing Parity and non parity, or something of that nature.

Search the PC Guide and you'll find lots of good info on memory.

The system running out of resources is probably a result of the way memory operates. any programs you run store data and/or instructions in memory for faster access than going to the hard drive. When you close the application, That information stays there until it is cleared out to be used for other applications. One way to clear a bit more memory is to open a text file, highlight then copy & paste one character. This copies that one character into memory, instead of the last thing that was on the clipboard, which could be a fairly decent size file. The clipboard only holds one thig at a time, so you reduce the amount of memory that's tied up by simply copying something really small before trying to run anything else.

You might also be seeing a problem with conventional memory instead of RAM. Here's an article form the Microsoft Knowledge Database about Optimizing Conventional Memory (http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q134/3/99.asp). Conventional memory is limited to 640K no matter how much RAM you have in the machine.

Another article from MS Tech Net concerning Performance Tuning (http://www.microsoft.com/TechNet/win98/Reskit/Part5/wrkc26.asp)

Check my site below, and you should be able to find more info on system optimization. Might take a bit of digging, but some good info is out there.

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Computer Information Links (http://www.geocities.com/paleopete/)

gardeness
10-05-2000, 05:28 PM
Thanks for all the good info! A couple questions:

Can a double side stick show only 1/2 of what it's supposed to be (ie a 64 meg showing as 32 meg)? Does that mean it's a bad stick, or maybe just not seated properly? Is there a way to tell what kind of memory from numbers on the stick (like mfg, megs, speed, etc)? If so, is there a site to interpret this info?

Paleo Pete
10-06-2000, 07:47 AM
Yes, that's exactly what happens with double sided memory when only single sided is supported. The machine only sees one side, which is half its actual capacity.

I think memory can be identified by the numbers, but don't know of a site that has any info about it.

------------------
If you had everything...Where would you put it?

Computer Information Links (http://www.geocities.com/paleopete/)