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View Full Version : Unable to Partition a drive using Win & disk management app



Fra
08-25-2011, 02:14 PM
Hi all.
On a new Win7 (home premium) pc that has 4 partitions.
In order
100MB NTFS
Boot C: 890GB
Recover D: 40GB
1GB NTFS

I want to create a number of partitions on the C: eg.(data, photos/video, backup)

Using the windows Disk management utility I can shrink the C: partition by half (i would like to make it just a 100GB but i don't have that option).
If I do this and create a new 'simple' drive (using all the of the unallocated area) I'm given a warning that there isn't enough disk space?

Trying a different tack I used Minitool Partition wizard V6 to resize the C:. It allowed the resize but couldn't allocate the newly created partition due to 'No empty mbr slots on the disk'

I was hoping that somebody may have an answer.
I'm stumped here at the first hurdle before I even think of installing any other software. TIA

Paul Komski
08-26-2011, 03:04 AM
1. Four primary partitions is the maximum (unless on modern EFI systems).
2. Within limits the C: drive can be resized but you cannot change its designation from primary to logical.

If you want additional partitions you need first to delete a primary partition and replace it with a logical partition (which will be within an extended partition). Just about any number of logical partitions can then be created in any adjacent space beside the first logical partition you create by expanding the extended partition into this space.

If you mess with the Recover partition its D letter may get lost or be inaccessible so the best place for a new logical partition would be the 1 GB partition at the end of the drive.

a. Copy contents of last partition if they are important and then delete the last partition.
b. Shrink the C partition.
c. Slide the D partirion adjacent to the C partition.
d. Create new LOGICAL partition in the unallocated space at the end of the drive of a size that suits.
e. Create additional LOGICAL partitions in any remaining unallocated space at the end of the drive.

If you cannot do this with Disk Management try GParted on a Live Linux CD or BootIt NG (http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-next-generation.htm) or Bootit BM (http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/bootit-bare-metal.htm).

Fra
08-26-2011, 08:06 AM
Thanks Paul for the reply.
Only the C: (OS & programs) & D: (recovery folders) are visible in windows.
So far I've been unable to see what's in the final 1GB partition.
Presuming that it contains nothing important I will delete it and follow your instructions.
I presume by shrinking the C: and moving D: (to create the free space at the end) that the data in D: will remain intact ?
Would I be better to copy the D: on to an external drive, resize the C: & D: create the new logical partitions and then copy the data back into the D:?
Thanks again.

123456
08-26-2011, 08:50 AM
Take a look at Easeus's free partition manager.
http://www.partition-tool.com/personal.htm

Sylvander
08-26-2011, 12:57 PM
1 I once non-destructively resized a non-empty NTFS partition [holding WinXP],and it went wrong.
Had to use a bootable TestDisk floppy to recover a working partition table, which got XP booting again.
WHEW! :)

2. Formed the opinion [by successfully doing it] that it was better to:
(a) Copy the contents [of the partition(s) to be resized] to some other handy location [an external HDD?]

(b) Delete the original contents.

(c) Resize [or delete and remake] the EMPTY formatted partitions.
It's MUCH quicker doing this, and much less risky methinks.

(d) Copy the contents back to their original partition [and delete the copies if all is well].

3. Question is: what to use to do the work?
If I remember right:
(a) I used Puppy_Linux->GParted for the initial non-destructive resize.
[It went wrong! Most unusual!]
GParted is REALLY GOOD; it NEVER normally lets me down like that.

(b) I normally use Puppy_linux->X_File_Explorer=Xfe to copy and restore the folder/file contents of partitions.
Just recently [last week] successfully used Xfe to copy about 500GB of the contents of a 750GB NTFS partition on an external HDD->[with FAULTY BLOCKS] to yet another NTFS partition on a different external HDD.
I'm using ddrescue right now [within Lupu-526] as I type to clone the bad HDD to yet another external HDD. :) :cool:

(c) I also would routinely make an image backup of the partition with its contents.
Actually like to make at least 1 image of the whole HDD with all its partitions and their contents.
Nice to have insurance. :)

Paul Komski
08-27-2011, 05:20 AM
Thanks Paul for the reply.
Only the C: (OS & programs) & D: (recovery folders) are visible in windows.
So far I've been unable to see what's in the final 1GB partition.
Presuming that it contains nothing important I will delete it and follow your instructions.
I presume by shrinking the C: and moving D: (to create the free space at the end) that the data in D: will remain intact ?
Would I be better to copy the D: on to an external drive, resize the C: & D: create the new logical partitions and then copy the data back into the D:?
Thanks again.
Once upon a time partitioning existing windows installations was much simpler. Windows 7 often comes with additional invisible but system partitions. Without knowing the specifics of your setup I personally would not do other than I suggested earlier and I would use Win 7's disk management to shrink C to whatever minimum it will allow.

No problem if you want to copy D: and the 1 GB partition elsewhere and then delete the originals before re-partitioning and copying stuff back. I would avoid doing this to the C: drive which is the main system partition and, if possible, only mess with it with Windows disk management.

I would also stay away from GParted for the creation of any NTFS partitions and only format these from within Windows.

Fra
08-27-2011, 08:16 AM
Thanks Paul, Sylvander and 123456 for you're advice and suggestions.

It's a while since I've had to roll the sleeves up and get back to basics. The XP machines, that I've been using, have been very reliable and trouble free.
I thought the transition to Win7 would have been simple (might have been if I'd built the puter) but a return visit to this forum has given me the info to tackle the task at hand.
Thank you again for all the help & assistance