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risk_reversal
12-17-2011, 07:17 AM
My trusted Epson 760 inkjet printer looks like it may finally have given up on me.

In respect of a replacement printer, I was wondering whether I should uninstall the old (Epson 760) printer software when I get my new printer or can I just leave it (running XP).

I do have a standalone scanner and I just wanted to make sure that once I replace the printer there are (hopefully) no issues between these two pieces of HW.

Many thanks for any info provided and apologies for asking a stupid question.

Seasons greetings

classicsoftware
12-17-2011, 08:42 AM
ALWAYS uninstall any unneeded software, ALWAYS. It usually use memory and resources....

Paul Komski
12-17-2011, 11:40 AM
If its just the printer drivers then its no harm to leave them as is but so often there is a lot of extra bloat and stuff running in the system tray that are completely unnecessary.

risk_reversal
12-17-2011, 01:46 PM
Many thanks for your replies.

It's just the printer software there is nothing running in memory according to Process Explorer/Task Manger (or in the SystemTray).

One final question please.

I am leaning on getting 2 printers, a cheap mono laser printer and a mid level inkjet for colour requirements and installing both of them on my pc (and using one at a time). Presumably, no reason to have such a set up.

Sorry I know that this must be another incredibly stupid question.

Seasons Greetings

PrntRhd
12-17-2011, 02:05 PM
Not so stupid, scanning software can be persistent in trying to run on the wrong device, print drivers not so much.

classicsoftware
12-17-2011, 11:30 PM
You have to take good hard look at a Color Laser. The cost per page of an Inkjet printer is so high compared to a laser printer. I personally think the best way to go is to get a network printer and print via TCP/IP. Am now recommending Brother printers as the #1 laser printer on the market. I also have had very good luck with Okidata. HP printers live on solely by their reputation. Samsung printer software is mentally retarded.

I like the:

http://www.brother-usa.com/USAImages/ModelImages/Medium/hl5340d.jpg
Brother HL-5370DW Laser Printer with Wireless Networking and Duplex (http://www.brother-usa.com/Printer/ModelDetail.aspx?ProductID=hl5370dw#.Tu1dplZibD0)

http://okidata.com/common/product-art/C330dn_top_AR.jpg
Okidata C330dn (http://okidata.com/mkt/html/nf/ColorPrinters.php?sku=62435103)

Paul Komski
12-18-2011, 01:04 AM
Not sure why the downer comment on Samsung. They do a workhorse color laser (http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-Color-Laser-Printer-CLP-325W/dp/B004H5YBU4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1324184070&sr=8-1) for 1/3 of the price of the linked Okidata.

OK they are not top of the range but I know three people who have been happily using them for the past couple of years to print normal A4 output from Documents and WebPages and the like. Admittedly they don't do anything but the thinnest photo paper but my own one (actually a CLP-320) has far superior color output than my Brother HL-4040CN.

mjc
12-18-2011, 04:41 AM
Samsung printer software is mentally retarded.

That may be the case for the Windows software, but in Linux the Samsung drivers just work. The only problem I've had with my Samsung mono laser is that the pick up roller glazed over rather quickly...but that was solved with a bit of very fine sandpaper.

classicsoftware
12-18-2011, 08:47 AM
Not sure why the downer comment on Samsung. They do a workhorse color laser (http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-Color-Laser-Printer-CLP-325W/dp/B004H5YBU4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1324184070&sr=8-1) for 1/3 of the price of the linked Okidata.

OK they are not top of the range but I know three people who have been happily using them for the past couple of years to print normal A4 output from Documents and WebPages and the like. Admittedly they don't do anything but the thinnest photo paper but my own one (actually a CLP-320) has far superior color output than my Brother HL-4040CN.

I installed three for a customer and it was nothing but a hassle. The drivers did not work out of the box, defective CD's. Finding the drivers on the website required assistance from Sherlock Holmes. They had to be downloaded and installed separately.

These were not color models so, I can't say. The fact it was an all in one may have been the problem.

Paul Komski
12-18-2011, 10:44 AM
The fact it was an all in one may have been the problem.
Who knows - but all I know is that I never have bought and would never buy a multifunction device of this sort.

risk_reversal
12-18-2011, 03:38 PM
PrntRhd said:
Not so stupid, scanning software can be persistent in trying to run on the wrong device, print drivers not so much.
I was afraid of that but good to know they get confused. I suppose on that basis I better just bin my original thought of having 2 printers.

Many thanks for all your tips and advice. I did not want to go overboard cost wise. I do however print some photos and am worried about thicker paper in laser printers plus the ones that I have seen curl the output.

Oh well, I guess I will just start looking at your recommendations and other reviews.

Seasons Greetings

Whyzman
12-18-2011, 03:40 PM
Most of what I print are B&W text documents. I'm not sure what the cost per page of the B&W laser printer I use turns out to be, but I know it is extremely inexpensive.

My main printer is an HP Laserjet 5 that is a workhorse. I purchased it used as a lease-back with a minimal page count. I've had it now for around 7 years and paid $125.00 for it. It has only one cartridge I have to worry about. As Classic suggested above, I have it connected to my router so it can be used by other computers on my network.

Classic's idea of a color laser has merit, and really would depend on your printing needs. There's a price to be paid for the multiple toner cartridges. Some may lock out the ability to print at all if one of the carts hits a minimum level. I haven't looked at the newer color lasers, but I would want to be sure that the carts can all be independently replaced as needed.

You are not going to get photo print quality from lasers. So, which direction you ultimately go, whether laser or inkjet, would be determined by your printing needs.

The "problem" with inkjet printers is that they need to be used regularly so the print-heads do not dry up. Again, I would recommend independent color carts. And, I would caution you to do some homework regarding "expiration and refill capabilities" as applies to any model you may be serious about.

Many printers today add wireless capabilities on the cheap. With routers so commonplace today I would suggest putting everything on your network.

I have one of each; a laser for document printing, and a multi-function primarily for photo printing, but I also do scan quite a bit with it since more and more companies are allowing email attachments. I'm not sure what the future for fax documents holds, but I receive fewer and fewer as time goes on.

The problem with any multi-function is akin to a DVD/TV combo...if one goes down you lose both...

mjc
12-18-2011, 04:20 PM
I was afraid of that but good to know they get confused. I suppose on that basis I better just bin my original thought of having 2 printers.

Having 2 or more printers is not a problem...it's two scanners that run different scanning software (not drivers, but the OCR/Scan/Copy/FAX/Do the dishes/wash the cat/everything else software) that's the problem. This, of course, applies to All-in-one devices, too...but one scanner/AIO and another printer on the same system, shouldn't be a problem at all.

Personally, though, if you are looking at an AIO, get a network ready one. It saves some headaches and allows ALL the machines on your network to have access to it. I'd even go with a network ready 'stand alone' printer, too, but a network ready small/personal laser gets a significant jump in price. And a true network printer doesn't actually connect to any single computer...but rather to the router/network, so it isn't really 'running' on any particular machine. You should probably install the full suite on one machine on the network to act as a 'controller', but that isn't really needed, as you can log in to the printer and administer it that way.

PrntRhd
12-18-2011, 08:52 PM
Color laser may or may not produce good enough quality, depending on what the output product expectations are and the size of the output.
"Photo quality" is one thing but "near-professional" quality is achievable on some newer color laser printers, when you get to 99.3+% color saturation, many look at the output to be acceptable. This was the opinion of a $300/hr color matching consultant I brought in to work with a customer.

Whyzman
12-18-2011, 09:11 PM
So how does one become a $300/hr color matching consultant? I can't seem to find it in any college curriculum...

PrntRhd
12-18-2011, 10:19 PM
You get that type of specialty job working in the graphics arts side of the printing business.
The guy was a Macintosh specialist doing digital color matching for the professional printing industry...the customer wanted the laser printed output of a skin cream to match the picture in a printed magazine advertisement, using 28 lb bright white color copier paper.
The customer had a 35 ppm print engine with an optional controller that could be calibrated using a densitometer or an electrospectrometer to get a Pantone color profile but the customer wanted more.
More means tweaking their Adobe Photoshop or other graphics program to achieve a desired output.

http://www.google.com/search?q=color+matching+consultants&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

You first have to calibrate the monitor, then calibrate the printer, then calibrate the graphics program, then fine tune the graphics program.
He estimated he could get a 99.8% saturation in 4 hours of tweak time.
(Yes that is $1200 for one print job).
Some customer print jobs are that particular, and some customers are that crazy about color.

mjc
12-19-2011, 12:07 AM
Some customer print jobs are that particular, and some customers are that crazy about color.

I'd drop the word color...

And folks wonder why some things cost so much?

PrntRhd
12-19-2011, 12:31 AM
Makes one wonder about the profitability in cosmetics, yes?
And the cost is a business tax write off.

risk_reversal
12-19-2011, 11:53 AM
mjc said:
Having 2 or more printers is not a problem...it's two scanners that run different scanning software (not drivers, but the OCR/Scan/Copy/FAX/Do the dishes/wash the cat/everything else software) that's the problem. This, of course, applies to All-in-one devices, too...but one scanner/AIO and another printer on the same system, shouldn't be a problem at all.
Some clarity required.

My system has/had
1. A flat bed scanner HP ScanJet 5370c. A bit old but works good. This is just a scanner.
2. My now defunct Epson 760 inkjet printer (purchased in 2000). A bit slow but excellent in every respect.

Now question if I keep the HP Scanjet 5370C can I install and run 2 printer, a mono laser and an inkjet printer. I do print photos not all the time but sometime and also I do use 100gms paper often.

So let say that I just want to copy a document will the scanner get confused if there are two printers ie mono laser and inkjet.

Most of the time I will just scan documents no colour but other times the documents will have say coloured pie charts.

From what your reply mjc this set up should work........


Whyzman said:
So how does one become a $300/hr color matching consultant? I can't seem to find it in any college curriculum..
Could you also please send me the link for that job....I would also like to let my name go forwards

Cheers and Seasons Greetings

Paul Komski
12-19-2011, 11:58 AM
Having more than one printer should never be a problem other than just one of them will be the default printer. When you go to print there is usually a drop down box in which the default would be found but from where you can choose any other installed printer. You can change the default from Control Panel >> Printers or similar.

Scanning is a bit different because they are more embedded within the system.

You can normally, for example, print with just the printer drivers installed. With scanning you also need to run specialised software - there being no "generic" way to scan information. The same is to some extent true of cameras, which are also imaging devices.

mjc
12-19-2011, 12:10 PM
No problems with that setup. It's pretty much the same as what my setup is different scanner, printers...an old HP flatbed scanner, a Samsung mono laser, a Samsung color laser and an HP5650 inkjet. That setup has run for several years in both Windows and Linux, with no problems. We recently replaced the scanner and inkjet with an all-in-one (network) that seems to be working quite well. No problems, so far, in any OS...and since it is directly connected to the network, it's always available to any other machine on the network. (PS:If you install just the basic HP drivers and NOT the full package, under Windows and administer the printer from a Linux box, you eliminate huge headaches with all the HP 'bloatware' in the full package...the Linux package is lean, mean and WORKS.)


Where the 'confusion' (and actual conflicts set in) is when one of the new items is an all-in-one (printer/scanner/fax/etc). It is almost a given that the support software for the all-in-one and the old scanner would be entirely different, not just different versions, but different programs. More than one, of that type of software, is worse than running multiple AV/antimalware apps, at the same time.

As to the actual printers and what gets printed where...almost every application will, when it is sending something to a printer, pop up a box to select some options, one of which is which printer the job gets sent to. Also, you will need to select, during the set up phase or from the Printer control panel applet, a default printer...this will be the printer that is automatically used for those things that don't give you a choice or for those that you just click 'print' and don't bother changing anything.

mjc
12-19-2011, 12:22 PM
You can normally, for example, print with just the printer drivers installed. With scanning you also need to run specialised software - there being no "generic" way to scan information. The same is to some extent true of cameras, which are also imaging devices.

Mostly...SANE, under Linux is pretty darn close to 'universal' in that regard. It is absolutely true for TWAIN drivers/software. But SANE seeks to replace that and break the driver/software link. This makes a much nicer package, because simply updating a driver/adding a new one won't break the 'support software', like it currently does with TWAIN devices. In many ways, if it were a different piece of hardware, the way TWAIN works would not be tolerated, at all...it would be like having to buy a new version of Office if you switched printers or a new version of Photoshop if you got a new video card.

Whether or not SANE is ever fully implemented for Windows is something that nobody really seems to know, but there is work being done towards that goal. As it is, there is some parts of SANE that do work (network scanning).

Paul Komski
12-19-2011, 12:32 PM
Mostly...SANE, under Linux is pretty darn close to 'universal' in that regard.
I'll say it again. Linux rocks!

risk_reversal
12-20-2011, 08:25 AM
mjc said:

No problems with that setup. It's pretty much the same as what my setup is different scanner, printers...an old HP flatbed scanner, a Samsung mono laser, a Samsung color laser and an HP5650 inkjet.

Where the 'confusion' (and actual conflicts set in) is when one of the new items is an all-in-one (printer/scanner/fax/etc). It is almost a given that the support software for the all-in-one and the old scanner would be entirely different, not just different versions, but different programs. More than one, of that type of software, is worse than running multiple AV/antimalware apps, at the same time.

As to the actual printers and what gets printed where...almost every application will, when it is sending something to a printer, pop up a box to select some options, one of which is which printer the job gets sent to. Also, you will need to select, during the set up phase or from the Printer control panel applet, a default printer...this will be the printer that is automatically used for those things that don't give you a choice or for those that you just click 'print' and don't bother changing anything.

mjc, thank you for taking the time to spell it out for me. Clearly understood now.

Thanks to all for their contributions also.

Since I needed an emergency printer for some important documents that I have to send I have now bought a (cheap) Samsung mono laser printer ML-1860 and I have for the time being installed this on a separate laptop.

I think that I have narrowed down the colour inkjet to a Canon and once I have purchased it, I will uninstall the driver to my trusted Epson 760 (which I still hope may start printing again).

Again to all many thanks

Seasons Greetings

david eaton
12-20-2011, 03:00 PM
One problem that can occur when two printers are installed is that Word always uses the default printer and changing it when printing can mess up a layout. easy to overome though change the printer as soon as you open Word