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Thread: How to put files on a CD R

  1. #1

    How to put files on a CD R

    yes I know you can use a burning program to put files on a cd r but is there another way to put something on?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Yes, just go into Windows Explorer and send whatever files you want to your CD-R drive. Then click on the drive and under file you can choose to write the files to the CD. That's with Windows XP. With another version of windows it might be a little different process.

  3. #3

    2 questions CD R and Easy CD Creator 5 basic

    on a cd r, do you have to format the cd r to use the option of right clicking and send because my xp version I can,t use the send option less I format the cd, please reply because I am confused, I knew you have to with rw but not cd r

    also I installed easy cd creator 5 basic and it told me its not incompatible but yet it still installed and still works, I don,t get it please reply

  4. #4
    A few days ago, I wanted to copy/paste some files to a CD-R. So, I formated it first and then did a copy/paste. It didn't work, so I had to get into my burning program and do it that way. I had to use a different disk because I think I ruined the first one. That worked OK. I'm not 100% certain on this, but I think with a CD-R, you can't do a copy/paste. You have to use your burning software to copy files to it. With a CD-RW, you can do a copy/past, but you have to format it first. Again, I could be wrong on this. So, it's best to wait until you hear from someone more knowledgeable then I am. There are quite a few members here who can give you a more definite answer to it.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    No One Stands So Tall As When They Stoop To Help A Child.
    _________________________________________________
    Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.
    ~James Baldwin~
    _________________________________________________
    Life is more accurately measured by the lives you touch than by the things you acquire.
    ~Author unknown~

  5. #5
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    Not all software supports formatting CDRs for packet-writing. I have never yet had an installation of Nero's InCD (up to v 3.33) that would do this for CDR media though I believe that Roxio's DirectCD can do this.

    WinXP's native CD-burner can write to CDRs but I have seen conflicting reports that this is on the one-hand packet-writing or on the other hand session-based burning. Since there is no formal formatting of the media for WinXP'e native burning software I would subscribe to the latter view.
    Take nice care of yourselves - Paul - ♪ -
    Help to start using BiNG. Some stuff about Boot CDs & Data Recovery Basics & Back-up using Knoppix.

  6. #6
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    I use DirectCD and it can indeed use a CD-R like a giant floppy [then use "Copy & Paste", "Drag N' Drop" & "Send To" etc], but:

    CD-RW disks are the ones recommended for use for the following very good reasons:
    1. Whereas with a CD-RW disk you can write and re-write about 1,000 times, with a CD-R you can only write once!
    2. Assuming you filled the disk at the 1st write that would be ok, but your unlikely to do that, and it makes no sense to use the disk like a giant floppy for just a single write.
    3. If you write a single file at the 1st session, then add a 2nd file at the 2nd session, then a 3rd file at the 3rd session etc, this is a bad way to use the disk. At the 2nd session the 1st used space is unusable and the 1st & 2nd files must be rewritten to a new location on disk [and so on for the 3rd].
    Space written to cannot be re-used.

    If Direct CD is running when a new blank disk is put in the drawer and closed, the program detects its presence and a dialog opens and asks to what use I wish to put the disk.
    Depending on my choice the disk will be formatted for use with DirectCD or Easy CD Creator.
    A program name "CD Eraser" was supplied to return a disk to its virgin status so it can be reformatted for use with a different application.
    This only really works with a CD-RW disk.
    I believe you can "Erase" a CD-R, but used space cannot be re-used.
    You can only use any remaining unused space.
    I've never actually tried this.
    Last edited by Sylvander; 11-13-2004 at 04:03 PM.

  7. #7
    Sylvander--When I tried to use a CD-R to do a copy/paste, I did it for one file and then put on another and then a third. Do you think that that is the reason it didn't work? In other words, if I would have used it for only one file, maybe it would have worked?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    No One Stands So Tall As When They Stoop To Help A Child.
    _________________________________________________
    Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.
    ~James Baldwin~
    _________________________________________________
    Life is more accurately measured by the lives you touch than by the things you acquire.
    ~Author unknown~

  8. #8

    Cd R And Cd Rw

    right now I have to format a cd r and cd rw and I am not getting files to be written option now either, also I can add and delete on my cd r, I can,t right click and send now unless I format every disc I use, I didn,t think you could copy or right click and send on a cd r, why am I not been asked to write my files now? what could be my problem? please reply and thank you everyone for helping me, you are all very nice people, I am very new at this, hope I am putting the messages in the right place, once again please reply

  9. #9
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    FrankSG
    To use a CD-R like a giant floppy using packet-writing software:
    1. You must begin with a new blank CD-R disk and format it for use with the packet-writing software.

    I tried an experiment using a new blank CD-R disk as follows:
    1. Put a new blank CD-R in my CD-RW drive and closed the drawer with "DirectCD" running in the background [an icon for it was showing in the System Tray (it is loaded at startup)].
    2. Formatted the CD-R [a dialog opened automatically and asked me to specify a use to which it should be put].
    3. Right-clicked on a wave file and clicked "Copy".
    4. Right-clicked on the CD-R [F: drive] and clicked "Paste".
    5. The file copied.
    6. Checked:
    Used Space = 56 MB
    File size = 24,193 kB
    7. Copied a 2nd file:
    Used Space = 81 MB
    1st file = 24,193
    2nd file = 24,643
    8. Copied 3rd file:
    Used space = 107 MB
    1st file = 24,193
    2nd file = 24,643
    3rd file = 26,906
    ------------------------
    Eject Disk:
    and selected:
    "Leave disc as it is so that it can be read and written through drive letter access in the future".
    -------------------------
    Loaded disc once more:
    Copied 4th file:
    Used space = 133 MB
    1st file = 24,193
    2nd file = 24,643
    3rd file = 26,906
    4th file = 26,537
    -------------------------
    Eject Disc:
    and selected:
    "Organize disc so it can be read in most standard CD-ROM drives.
    You will have to make this disc writable to add more files to it."
    [It took 2 or 3 minutes to finalize the disc]
    --------------------------
    Loaded disk yet again:
    Attempt to "Copy & Paste" failed.
    "Access Denied". [Disc write protected?]
    -----------------------------------------
    Ran "CD Eraser":
    It would not "erase" the disc.
    It reported: "The media is not a CD-ReWritable disc".
    ---------------------------------------------------
    CONCLUSIONS
    1. The disc must be new and blank when you try to bring it into use.
    2. It must then be formatted for use with the packet-writing application.
    3. So long as it is not "finalized" [when ejected] it can be re-loaded and re-written to.
    4. Once "finalized" it cannot then be further written to.
    5. It cannot be returned to its "virgin" state to make it re-usable.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    Does that help you any Darmitage?

  10. #10
    That does answer some of my questions, Sylvander. I can see two reasons why it didn't work for me. One reason might have been that I don't have DirectCD. I relied on the built-in software in XP Home. Secondly, when I copied the files to the CD, I didn't try to use them on my computer. The files were for my son to use on his computer. After my son went home and put the CD in, he called me and said that his computer couldn't see the files. I did some reading last night, and if I understood it right, burning files on a CD may sometimes not work if the CD is used on another computer.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    No One Stands So Tall As When They Stoop To Help A Child.
    _________________________________________________
    Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.
    ~James Baldwin~
    _________________________________________________
    Life is more accurately measured by the lives you touch than by the things you acquire.
    ~Author unknown~

  11. #11
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    To use the WinXP native burning software there is a two-stage process. First, copy the files to the CDDrive letter under MyComputer. Secondly, verify you have selected the correct files and choose to write the files.

    The following is straight from the help files.
    To copy files and folders to a CD
    Insert a blank, writable CD into the CD recorder.
    Open My Computer.
    Click the files or folders you want to copy to the CD. To select more than one file, hold down the CTRL key while you click the files you want. Then, under File and Folder Tasks, click Copy this file, Copy this folder, or Copy the selected items.
    If the files are located in My Pictures, under Picture Tasks, click Copy to CD or Copy all items to CD, and then skip to step 5.

    In the Copy Items dialog box, click the CD recording drive, and then click Copy.
    In My Computer, double-click the CD recording drive. Windows displays a temporary area where the files are held before they are copied to the CD. Verify that the files and folders that you intend to copy to the CD appear under Files Ready to be Written to the CD.
    Under CD Writing Tasks, click Write these files to CD. Windows displays the CD Writing Wizard. Follow the instructions in the wizard.
    Take nice care of yourselves - Paul - ♪ -
    Help to start using BiNG. Some stuff about Boot CDs & Data Recovery Basics & Back-up using Knoppix.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Komski
    To use the WinXP native burning software there is a two-stage process. First, copy the files to the CDDrive letter under MyComputer. Secondly, verify you have selected the correct files and choose to write the files.
    Paul--You have just refreshed my memory! You are correct on that because I had done it before but forgot about it when I tried to copy the files for my son. When I tried to copy the files for him, I didn't do the second step.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    No One Stands So Tall As When They Stoop To Help A Child.
    _________________________________________________
    Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.
    ~James Baldwin~
    _________________________________________________
    Life is more accurately measured by the lives you touch than by the things you acquire.
    ~Author unknown~

  13. #13
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    I wonder if WinXP makes the disk in an ISO 9660 format when "finalised"?
    That's the format that DirectCD uses and ONLY CD-R disks can be closed as ISO 9660. Only when so closed can the disk be read on ANY OTHER PC. If not so closed, in order to read the disk [CD-R or CD-RW], the other PC needs to have the same software [WinXP] that you used to format the disk and copy the files [or at least the reader part].
    He would also need a multi-read CD-ROM drive methinks.

  14. #14
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    I'm open to correction but I thought packet-writing used UDF and not iso9660 and that such formatted CDs never need any formal closure to make them readable elsewhere. Other systems that are unable to read the UDF fomat can have software installed that will make such CDs readable. In this regard Nero's InCD comes with a distributable verion of EasyWrite Reader.

    I don't know how portable the CDs burned with WinXP's native software are and I have seen the software both described as session-based and as packet-writing-based. More homework to do there but since the CDs used by WinXP don't require formal formatting I have always assumed they used session-based burns using iso9660 - but no idea whether they are closed after each "session".

    PS Found this quite informative link at http://www.jufsoft.com/badcopy/udf_recovery.asp
    Last edited by Paul Komski; 11-14-2004 at 12:13 PM. Reason: PS added
    Take nice care of yourselves - Paul - ♪ -
    Help to start using BiNG. Some stuff about Boot CDs & Data Recovery Basics & Back-up using Knoppix.

  15. #15
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    Just started reading this...seems to be rather informative:

    http://www.computermusic.co.uk/tutorial/cds/cdmain.asp
    Lighten up! --- A merry heart does good like a medicine. (Proverbs 17:22)

  16. #16
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    Somehow I managed a duplicate posting.
    Last edited by Sylvander; 11-14-2004 at 02:10 PM.

  17. #17
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    From the DirectCD help files:

    ISO 9660
    An international standard that specifies how data is arranged (its logical format) on a CD-ROM. This includes standards for the format of file names and directory names. CDs written in the ISO 9660 format can be read by computers running under various operating systems such as DOS, Macintosh, OS/2, Windows, and UNIX.

    Ejecting a DirectCD Disc to Read on Another Computer :
    When you eject a CD-R DirectCD disc from the drive and you want to read it on another computer that has a standard CD-ROM drive, the disc must be formatted as an ISO 9660 closed session disc.
    Note: To make the disc readable on a standard CD-ROM drive, the disc is closed as an ISO 9660 format. This format information requires 22 MB of space on the disc for the first session, and 13 MB for each additional session. Only CD-R discs can be closed as an ISO 9660 format. CD-RW discs do not support the ISO format.

    UDF v1.5
    Universal Disk Format. A file system standard that enables a CD-Recordable drive to be used as a logical device on a computer system. In other words, UDF lets you read files from and write files to a CD in your CD-R or CD-RW drive, just as you would read and write files to a floppy disk or a hard disk drive. DirectCD creates discs with the UDF format to make the reading and writing possible.

    Reading DirectCD Discs on Other Computers :
    The UDF Reader driver (also called the Adaptec DirectCD Reader) enables MultiRead CD-ROM/DVD-ROM drives to read DirectCD (UDF) formatted CD-RW discs.
    The UDF reader is automatically installed on your computer when you install DirectCD. Discs that are created with DirectCD can also be read on another Windows computer. If DirectCD is not installed on that computer, the UDF reader will be automatically installed from the DirectCD disc when it is inserted in the drive.
    [When I tried this using CD-RW disks on my sons' PC it didn't work! (Go figure!)]

  18. #18
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    Have always found this to be a difficult area to get to grips with but my understanding is that the packet-writing to CDR is done with variable length packets (efficient use of the available space) whereas packet-writing to CDRW is done with fixed length packets. Both forms of packet-writing use UDF, which can be applied to both erasable and to non-erasable media.

    It is possible to convert variable length packets (because they contain contiguous data) to ISO 9660. It is also possible to then close the ISO 9660 to a Level 3 TOC and to close the session or to close the disk. Following closure of a session another UDF session can be started and finalised. Once a disk is closed the TOC will note this and not allow the disk to be reopened.

    When CDRW are formatted for packet-writing it is usual for this to be done at the start with a finite number of identically sized packets or "blocks". This is how they emulate the fat system of a floppy diskette's "sectors". They do however have to keep track of these "blocks" and none of the disc can be converted to ISO 9660 at any Level.

    For fixed-length packets on CDRW, the consequences include high overhead to keep track of all the blocks and an inability to convert the disc to any Level of ISO 9660. Although they can be reused about 1000 times they cannot store as much as a CDR, have slower access times and cannot be read in a convential CD player - though the software makers claim to provide additional software to make these disks readable elsewhere.

    It looks likely that DirectCD converts each UDF session to ISO 9660 after each file is burned to a CDR and then closes it. This seems to be the most likely methodology and is also probably how the native WinXP burning works. It all seems to boil down to a packet-writing combination of UDF (for writing packets) and ISO 9660 (for readability of CDR), which is probably why any previous stuff I have read about the WinXP burning has appeared to be contradictory.

    If anyone can add to this that would be just great.
    Take nice care of yourselves - Paul - ♪ -
    Help to start using BiNG. Some stuff about Boot CDs & Data Recovery Basics & Back-up using Knoppix.

  19. #19

    question on exporting address book

    I am having a problem exporting my address book on to a RW CD! keeps on saying that my address book all ready exists on A drive but I am clicking on to D drive, I can export on to floppy disc without any problem but not on to D drive on my RW CD, I am running windows XP, can someone please help me out, thanks

  20. #20
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    You can't format a CD-R, you can only erase files on a CD-RW. The only way to format a CD-R is break into pieces and throw it out! :-)

  21. #21

    how to export and import hotmail address book

    trying to figure out how to export and import my hotmail address book of contacts to a cd or floppy, can someone please help, thank you

  22. #22
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    If this is the address book on the webmail site you should be able to first synchronise it with your windows address book and then export from the windows address book's file menu as normal.
    Take nice care of yourselves - Paul - ♪ -
    Help to start using BiNG. Some stuff about Boot CDs & Data Recovery Basics & Back-up using Knoppix.

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