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Thread: CPU fan error!

  1. #1
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    CPU fan error!

    Okay, I've gone and built myself a semi-new computer (new mobo, processor, case, ram). I've reused components from the old PC -- HD, CD burner, video card, sound card, Firewire card.

    I've finally started up the new PC, and in BIOS, I'm getting a "CPU fan error!" I've checked, the fan is running, I've unplugged it, plugged it back in, it's spinning away. I can't get past this. What am I doing wrong?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    What is the mobo? I assume that you have the CPU fan connected to the mobo's CPU_Fan header? That's where the fan RPM is monitored, and power is provided.

    Sometimes there's an RPM threshold that the fan must meet or a fan error will be declared by the BIOS. I think typically this is 1500 RPM. This may or may no be adjustable in your BIOS. Another possibility--does the CPU fan connector have three or four pins?

    Finally, did you use the stock HSF that came with the CPU or use another? It may be possible that the HSF you used is a variable speed type and is running below the BIOS error threshold.
    Pop Pop
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  3. #3
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    My mobo is ASUS P5P800. I do have the cpu fan connector (4-pin) connected to the corresponding cpu fan plug (there is a 3-pin chassis plug also on this mobo, I'm not using it).

    I used the stock HSF, came with my Intel Petium 4 processor. When I look in my BIOS settings, the fan rpm is literally in the red at about 1350 rpm. I've also noticed the CPU temp creeping up, from about 53c to 64c.

    I can set the fan ratio, anywhere from like 40% to 90%. Where should this be set so I increase the fan speed and decrease the temp?

  4. #4
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    Note: I've bumped the ratio up to 90%, getting the fan up over 1500rpm (barely) and it's still in the red, still getting an error.

  5. #5
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    Soo...I just selected "Ignore" in the rpm monitor, and I stopped getting the error. This new case has two case fans, in addition to the CPU fan and the PSU fan. Will I be okay?

  6. #6
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    Go to majorgeeks.com (or somewhere) and download a monitoring utility. Motherboard Monitor (MBM) is very good but has problems with my Asus board. Try that first. If it has issues you can use one like CPUCool. Keep an eye on your temps and fan speed.

    Now, check to see if that Asus board has a feature called Q-Fan (or Fan-Q). Look in the mobo manual (I'm at work and can't). That's a BIOS monitoring/control feature that dynamically controls the fan speed. If the board has it, and it's enabled, turn it off. This will set your stock HSF to run full blast. Also, there is another setting for monitoring and control--something like PWM/DC. Make sure that is set to DC. Basically what we want to do here is set the BIOS to allow HSF to run full tilt. If we achieve that in terms of the BIOS settings, and you're still barely getting to 1500 RPM, it is a bad sign for the fan. If that remains to be the case, I would not hesitate to dump the stock HSF and buy a GOOD third party one. I recommend Zalman but there are other very good ones from manufacturer's like ThermalTake.

    The temps you quoted are high-ish and closing in on the dancing with death zone. Thermal shutdown for a Prescott P4 is around 67C. Did you use a good thermal paste or did you go with the stock thermal pad that was with/on the CPU HSF?
    Last edited by pop pop; 07-06-2005 at 09:42 PM.
    Pop Pop
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  7. #7
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    I agree with the above, you're dancing with disaster at those temps. If your fan ratio has a 100% setting, use it. 110% would be even better judging by your temps and the results of raising it to 90%. Turning off the fan speed adjustment as mentioned above sounds like a very good idea, that should let it run full speed, which I would want anyway.

    Check your motherboard manual or online and find out what settings are available for the fan, get that 1500 RPM up and the 64C DOWN...I would double check the thermal compound and probably would replace it if I were in your shoes. Only a thin coating is needed, too much is actually detrimental. A different fan might be an option to consider too, but properly set up the factory unit should do the trick.
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    Another idea... you say you used the stock HSF that came with your P4, right? That suggests you used the thermal pad that came with it. Did you take off the thin plastic sheet covering the thermal pad before installing the stock HSF? If you followed the instructions that came with your CPU, I assume you did take it off, but not everybody likes reading the instructions.

    If you can't get the stock fan speed into the 1700-1800rpm range (I think that's the standard top speed of the latest Intel HSF units) then I would suggest emailing Intel and getting a replacement. Retail CPU's have a 1-year warranty and I don't doubt that Intel would ship you a new HSF unit right away! All they need is some of the codes off the CPU box (both for verification and for investigation) and you're good to go.

  9. #9
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    I was having problems with my new build (Asus A8N-E + AMD 3000+ (venice core) where the warning about the CPU fan kept coming up. I replaced the CPU heatsink and fan to fix without success.

    I eventually phoned ASUS direct and was told to turn of the COOL and QUIETE facillity until a new set of motherboard drivers were relelased for it. The old (at the moment the only) drivers work with the new venice core but CaQ has problems with it. New version (for me) expected in about a month. Since turning it off I have had no problems. So if you have CaQ enabled try turning it off.
    Ernie

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  10. #10
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    OMG! I read these posts and immediately broke into a cold sweat. My stock HSF did not come with a thermal pad. Nowhere in the instructions did it mention thermal paste. Arrrgh!!

    Okay, I'll pick up some thermal paste today, gut that sucker tonight, and mess with the BIOS setup. (There is a Q-Fan option in there, I'll disable it, because I know it's enabled right now). I have to say, I'm worried about getting the HSF off the mobo, it seemed to lock down pretty securely. There are instructions for removing it in the CPU instructions tho.

    I can't believe that Intel wouldn't mention thermal paste or a thermal pad, or provide the stuff with the CPU, if it is that important!

  11. #11
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    Some heatsink/fans come with a small pad already attached, as did/does my AMD heatsink. Nothing else was/is required. In fact the instructions state that if I use paste I nullify the waranty for it. Check the instructions that were supplied with it carefully.

    I keep the AsusProbe sitting on my bar and when doing something I bring it up to sit visible on the desktop.Since I turned off CaQ my idle temp sits at about 32c and normal (non-stress) operating temp is about 36c. Whilst doing something intensive I go upto about 39-40c. I have only seen it once above this temp in the past 2 weeks. Once i know that everything is definately OK I will then set the AsusProbe to work in the background
    Ernie

    The difference between perseverance and obstinancy is that one is made from strong will, and the other from strong won't
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    Do you have reading problems? Don't let it deter you. This is what YOU can do if you try http://www.erniek.eclipse.co.uk

  12. #12
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    Okay, now I'm really getting upset. I think I removed the thermal pad when I took the heatsink off the processor. Honestly, I never looked at the bottom of the heatsink when I put it on. The paste doesn't seem to be working, the cpu is running hotter than ever -- reaching over 70C!!!!! I'm absolutely terrified I'm going to burn up my computer. I cannot get the &$#@ fan to even reach 1500 rpm. It looks like if it would run faster, the cpu would cool down.

    I think I've &#@$ up royally in removing whatever was already on the bottom of the heatsink. The guys at the local PC store said I need to allow 10 hrs for the thermal compound to set. Maybe I should just suck it up and buy a new/different heatsink...

    I'm gonna go throw up now....

  13. #13
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    Ok, since my last panic attack: CPU temp hovering around 57-60C. Fan has managed to ramp up to between 1600-1700 rpm, and BIOS is still in the red on this speed. It still seems hot to me...is this when I make a call to...whom? Mobo manufacturer? Intel? Just buy a new HSU?

  14. #14
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    Oh, and I don't know what CaQ is.

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    If you have enough of the new thermal paste left to re-do the CPU, here's a crash course in emergency CPU reinstallation...

    What you will need:

    1 bottle of 91% Isopropyl alcohol (from the pharmacy department of your local Walmart or other generic store)

    1 pack of eye glasses disposable cleaning wipes (alcohol-based, from the optical department of your local Walmart or other eye glasses store)

    1 roll of toilet paper

    1 box of plastic sandwich bags

    15-20 minutes of your time

    Here's what you do:

    Remove the CPU's HSF and the CPU - lay them both on a table or other flat surface. Take some toilet paper, fold it up (about 4-6 layers) and get it wet with the bottle of Isopropyl alcohol (just wet, not soaked). Clean everything off the HSF and CPU - you will go through a lot of toilet paper. It doesn't matter what type of paste or pad was on there, just clean it all off. At first you will just be scraping stuff off, then you will be scrubbing them both (be careful with the CPU!) and finally buff them to a good shine.

    Now use a couple of the eye glasses disposable cleaning wipes to get off all the lint left behind by the toilet paper (it's small but it's there). They should both be perfectly clean surfaces by now, so don't touch them with your fingers! Now put some of the thermal paste you bought onto the CPU. Follow the directions carefully for the proper amount (just remember it's easier to add more than re-clean the CPU!). A couple BB-sized chunks of paste should be enough. Now stick your hand into one of the plastic sandwich bags and use your finger in the point to spread & dab the thermal paste over the CPU's surface. Make sure there's a thin even layer over the whole CPU.

    Once you're done with that, just for good measure, rub the rest of the thermal paste that's on the plastic sandwich bag onto the bottom of the HSF. Rub it in gently, and this will help to fill in the grooves on the HSF's surface that contacts the CPU. I find this cuts the "burn-in" time by half. Now very carefully put the CPU back in its socket (again, don't touch the top of the CPU!) and then put the HSF back on the CPU. Plug the HSF back into the CPU_FAN header on the mobo - it's bad to skip this last step.

    There, you're done.

  16. #16
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    CaQ is probably the equivalent of Q-Fan for the Asus board that Ernie has.

    I would take Saph's advice. Consider it all a good learning experience. If it was me, I would replace the HSF, don't trust what I see at this point. You could call Intel, I've heard good things about them standing behind their stuff, but then you would have to wrestle with the ever so delicate admission that you removed the thermal pad. You could leave that part out and just provide the facts about the fan RPM.

    Alternatively, buy a really good third party HSF. We will all offer suggestions if you go this way--I would
    Last edited by pop pop; 07-07-2005 at 10:08 PM.
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    Hahaha! Yeah, pop pop will have you spending $50 on an all-copper Zalman! But seriously, Zalman's are high quality HSF units. Even one of their cheaper part-aluminum 70-80mm fan versions would be MUCH better than the stock HSF. Definitely something to consider...

    Keep in mind that my directions stay the same, no matter what HSF you have.

  18. #18
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    Me, suggest spending on quality? You betcha.

    There are very good HSF units for less like this ThermalTake. (assumes your P4 is an LG775)

    There...you made me go and recommend something besides a Zalman.
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  19. #19
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    You guys are the best! Thank you all so much for your help, and yes, I've learned a TON in a very short period of time.

    Okay, pop pop, I'll check my local PC store for that Thermaltake (all about locally owned business, if I can afford it, but not if they're $20+ more than newegg). Got any suggestions with blue LED lights on it? I may add a third case fan too, at the back (got one on the side, and one in front).

    Temp held pretty steady at 60C, and rpms ramped up to 2200-2300 yesterday evening. That HSF takes its time ramping up...

    When I took the HSF off, and *ahem* removed the thermal pad, I did use a tiny amount of alcohol on a q-tip to clean the surface. Such a small amount that I could see it drying as I swiped it.

  20. #20
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    And yes, my Prescott is LGA775/Socket T. And I've printed out the instructions for cleaning and reinstalling the CPU/heatsink.

  21. #21
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    LED equipped HSFs...hmm...blue LED equipped HSFs....hmmm, again

    This looks very interesting: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16835128008

    LGA775 compatible, large 108mm fan, manually adjustable speed (1700-3500RPM), NEON BLUE LED, new product from Gigabyte (mobo manufacturer), and nicely priced at $24.95.

    My case fans are all blue. My Zalman Cu7700 is the model without LED . This Gigabyte would look very nice in there.
    Last edited by pop pop; 07-08-2005 at 05:41 PM.
    Pop Pop
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  22. #22
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    yes CandQ is the same as Q-fan. when in opertion it reduces the speed of the CPU and chip fans when th ecomputer is at idle and speeds them up when under pressure. At present it stops the CPU fan totally when set so as per instructions from Asus it is turned of. At least I know that the warning alalrms do work when things are not right

    On my new comp the rear fan (extract) is blue. The side panel (Blowing cold in directly onto board and just to the side of CPU is tri coloured - red/blue/green and the front (cold air inwards) is plain black as it cannot be seen. cable are light blue UV with single UV strip light at bottom of case.
    Ernie

    The difference between perseverance and obstinancy is that one is made from strong will, and the other from strong won't
    Henry Ward Beecher
    Do you have reading problems? Don't let it deter you. This is what YOU can do if you try http://www.erniek.eclipse.co.uk

  23. #23
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    LOL that was the HSU I had in mind, pop pop My temps are better, still around 50-53C ATM, added a third case fan (blue, natch!) and when I order that Gigabyte heatsink, I'll order a fourth case fan. And ErnieK, what are these UV strips?? I may have to get one of those, but maybe that's a bit overboard, if the HSU has LEDs too I would have preferred red LEDs but blue seems to be quite popular, and easy to get.

  24. #24
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    Just the same as a florecent strip light, except that it is UV. The only rreason I have it is because it was cheaper to buy hte UV cables with this as part of the pack.

    UV (IDE/Floppy) cables cost 10.00 each in Edinburgh. A pack with every thing (Floppy- IDE - Light) in Galashiels was the same price. 10.00 the pack. Shop must have under-priced it but I am not complaining.
    Ernie

    The difference between perseverance and obstinancy is that one is made from strong will, and the other from strong won't
    Henry Ward Beecher
    Do you have reading problems? Don't let it deter you. This is what YOU can do if you try http://www.erniek.eclipse.co.uk

  25. #25

    problem fix ????

    i am new to this forum, and did you guys by any chance get to fix the cpu fan error problem ?

    well, i have got 5 p5p800 mobo, tested with different cpu, different cooling solution, all no go.. i think it has something to do with motherboard.. !!!

    i am really upset with asus products now. low quality control !!!

    Thx

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