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Thread: RIMM in DIMM

  1. #1
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    RIMM in DIMM

    I have a stick of RAM that had been in a since scrapped oldish system. Turns out its a 512MB stick of RIMM. I was playing with upgrading a 166GHz Pentium Dell that had 32MB on it with a number of DIMM SDRAM sticks I had lying around. All that was fine and dandy till I added-in this RIMM stick. The system then reported a total of 96MB (32 + 64 I supposed) but when I looked up the specs, that was when I found out it was 512 of RIMM.

    Two basic questions.
    1) Can using a RIMM module like this do any physical harm?
    2) Would the misreported memory value be due to a mobo limitation of 64MB per slot (I havent yet been able to find a manual on the Dell support site) or be more likely to be due in some way to using a RIMM in a DIMM because of the way the circuitry differs.
    Take nice care of yourselves - Paul - ♪ -
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  2. #2
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    I'm not a memory expert, but I would bet on the different RAM architecture as the problem. The way the the motherboard is setup and the way the RAM is setup is a mis-match.
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  3. #3
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    Talking

    Hi Paul!

    I'm just now learning about RIMM and RDRAM. That RIMM stick could very well be quite an expensive stick of memory. From what I understand RIMM is being used for high end expensive computers and gaming machines . It is not supposed to be compatible with ordinary mobos so I don't know if I would run it or not. When I learn more I'll let ya know!!
    LG


  4. #4
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    RIMMs are outdated technology. They were used with the first P4s as they were supposed to give better perfromance than the older SDRAM. DDR came along and beat them out, and were cheaper to boot.

    RIMMs also need to be installed in pairs to work properly. So yeah using the wrong type of RAM would cause problems. I am suprised it worked at all.
    Erik

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik
    I am suprised it worked at all.
    No sh*t!! How the $&#% did you get that RIMM in there, anyway!? That's incredible that it worked! But there's a very strong possibility that you fried that RIMM! Voltages and protocols are all completely different. Are you sure it's a RIMM, though? RDRAM modules are supposed to be made with heatspreaders over the RAM chips. They're pretty difficult to confuse with other types of DRAM.

  6. #6
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    On the module is a glued piece of paper marked;
    VDATA MEMORY EXPERT (Warranty void if removed)
    MSGVD3E3G4180A1A0E
    PC133(3) 256MX16
    S/N:541TH (VDABC1816)

    Googling for http://www.google.ie/search?hl=en&q=...G=Search&meta= led me to believe it was RIMM - however since the module only has 168 pins it must be DIMM I guess and I shouldnt have looked so cursorily at that page.

    But that still wouldn't explain the actual and reported memory size disparity, which is what I thought strange; it was only an afterthough to start googling and even then i got the 512 and 256 mixed up - grrr.

    The PC I was trying to install it on was a Dell Dimension XPS M166s but I couldnt find the relevant specs on the Dell site and Crucial gave no good results either: http://www.crucial.com/store/listpar...ries&submit=Go
    Take nice care of yourselves - Paul - ♪ -
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  7. #7
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    PC133 means it is SDRAM. RDRAM are PC600 and PC800.

    The difference in actual size and reported size could be the mobo limitations, or the mobo could have problems with the density of that particular stick. Or because it is double sided and only likes single sided sticks etc..

    SDRAM has several potential issues like that that we are blessed to not have to deal with when it comes to DDR and newer ram.

    Heck I had two sticks of 256MB SDRAM that worked happily in an old machine but only showed up as 128MB sticks. I tried those sticks in 5 other machines and they did not work at all. Well one machine did recognize them as a 64MB module.

    I finally gave them both away to my brother in law who had a couple of old machines that could use them. One could use the full 256MB and the other could use only 128MB. Go figure.
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  8. #8
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    Thanks folks - its is now fairly obviously SDRAM - and I think I have grasped the issues. As you will be well aware I am much happier with software; but then software and hardware do of course have to work hand in hand so I am forced to gradually and reluctantly learn about these bits and bobs (pun intended).
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  9. #9
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    Well it makes more sense being SDRAM, as the dividers in the RIMM chips are in different positions than other memory chips. (we could not visualize how RIMM could be forced into that slot).

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrntRhd
    Well it makes more sense being SDRAM, as the dividers in the RIMM chips are in different positions than other memory chips. (we could not visualize how RIMM could be forced into that slot).
    ...and work.
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  11. #11
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    256Mx16 just tells you the specs on the individual RAM chips, not the whole module itself (the whole module must be 64-bits wide for SDRAM/DDR/DDR2 - and 16/32-bits for various RDRAM).

    The fact that the stick is only recognized at 64MB (when it should be 128MB by my guess - depending on the number of RAM chips) sounds like a RAM limitation imposed by the good ol' i430 series chipsets. Check the code on the Northbridge itself and let us know what it is. If it's the one I think it is (i430FX) then you won't want to put more than 64MB total in that thing anyway. Come to think of it, I'm surprised a module of that density even worked!

  12. #12
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    Question

    This is from my class,




    RDRAM and RIMMs

    If your PC is really fancy—and rather expensive—then it might take RIMMs. These RAM modules are based on a memory technology called RDRAM, currently the ultimate in RAM performance and design. RIMMs are quite expensive in comparison with other technologies, a fact which has limited its use to mainly high-performance PCs and for high-speed gaming fanatics.



    Is there another type of RIMM??


    LG


  13. #13
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    There are many types of RIMM's. Check our Sheaiden website for more info. The 16-bit 168-pin RIMM's are the most common, but the 32-bit 232-pin RIMM's enjoyed a brief period in the limelight before everyone got smart and went to dual-channel DDR RAM. RDRAM is just waaaay too expensive.

    And I'm guessing that info you got in your class is a bit outdated, eh? That's to be expected, though - the world of computer technology changes daily. You can't really assume that new versions of your class reading materials will be published every month.

  14. #14
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    How fascinating!! That web site of yours saph is just wonderful! Thank you for answering me, I've got to get this stuff straight if I want to pass this class. You would think they would at least try to update some of the information they are presenting but you're right, the computer world does change daily while text books don't. Now I get to have some fun with the teacher, perhaps I'll just point him to your site! The teacher I have is Scott Jernigan and he's supposed to be pretty good, guess I'm just not asking enough questions.
    LG


  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by LadyGrey
    guess I'm just not asking enough questions.
    You know, I do that a lot when I talk to "muggles" about technology. At some point, you just have to stop explaining and cut it off. Keep it simple or you'll go right over people's heads. With CPU design, for instance, it doesn't pay to go into the implications of inclusive vs exclusive cache architectures - because no one cares!! I keep a lot to myself simply because it's not important to the end-user and you'll only end up confusing and alienating your audience.

    I don't have to do that as much here on the forums, but there's not a lot of call for microprocessor design debates around here! I'd really like to bounce some GPU/VPU design issues off some other people right now (especially with "The Shader Wars" in full swing) but there's not a lot of call for that, either. If your class professor is knowledgable in such things, tell him to join the forums! I love to chat about this stuff!

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