Samsung releases blood pressure tracking for the Galaxy Watch Active 2

A step forward in self-health monitoring

Samsung releases blood pressure tracking for the Galaxy Watch Active 2

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It seems Samsung has surprisingly managed to get ahead of its schedule for smartwatch app development releasing its Health Monitor app in South Korea before the release date of the third quarter of 2020. The reason why this Health Monitor app is such a big deal to Galaxy Watch Active 2 smartwatch owners is because, bundled in, is blood pressure tracking, a big step forward in keeping track of your vitals.

Samsung also suggested that by that third-quarter deadline, the Health Monitor app will similarly support ECG heart monitoring, close to that of the Apple Watch 4 released in 2018, bringing even more stellar tracking for you smartwatch owners.

For those hoping to throw away their more traditional blood pressure cuffs, hold off. While the blood pressure monitoring is a brilliant bit of tech, you will need to keep recalibrating it, every four weeks, in fact, which is a slight annoyance. Moreover, because it uses optical-based sensors to track blood pressure, it is limited to only measure the change in blood pressure rather than a constant number. While there are some downsides, what this blood pressure monitoring does allow is tracking over time, allowing you to see trends, feeding these to your doctor if you suspect that you are suffering from some sort of health issue, and maybe preventing a condition worsening.

Unfortunately, all this impressive tech is limited to you lucky Galaxy Watch Active 2 smartwatch owners in the South Korea region for now and Samsung hasn’t announced any plans to bring it to the rest of the world.

We hope that Samsung does bring these features worldwide as they’re not only great additions to smartwatches but could also catch potential health conditions quicker than what’s usually possible.