Intel Arc A-series prices leaked, look competitive

Pricing for the Arc Alchemist graphics cards looks to be between $99 and $399

Arc A-series prices - Intel Arc Alchemist card

Last Updated on

Thanks to a leaked document doing the rounds, purportedly from one of Intel’s Taiwanese partners, Arc A-series prices could be competitive.

The document, first seen by Wccftech, is intriguing for anyone keeping options open for a future graphics card purchase. Particularly if the cost will be the primary consideration.

According to the leak, Intel’s pricing for the Arc A7700, will not be over $399. If it can be kept to, that would put it near RTX 3060Ti and Radeon 6650 XT cards, in what Intel refers to as the ‘Performance+’ bracket.

Source: WccfTech

Just below is the Arc A750. Pegged across the ‘Performance+’ and ‘Performance-’ brackets, the A750 is potentially a lower-performance variant of the A770. It appears as an 8GB only card, pitched closest to the RTX 3060 and Radeon 6600.

Suggested pricing for the A750 bridges the high $200 and low $300s mark, with the same 225W requirement as the A7700.

Further down, the price-list Intel has matched NVidia far more than AMD. The Arc A580 8GB 175W sits at the RTX 3050 level in the $200-$299 bracket. However, the slide suggests nothing matching the Radeon 6500 XT or 6400.

This would leave the ‘Mainstream+’ $150-199 area empty for Intel.

The next Intel Arc card, the 75W A380, appears just below the $100-149 level. Which would be just behind the GTX 1650. The A380 is already available in China, but its future availability elsewhere is yet to be made clear. So this could provide a suggestion that the US and wider markets will get the part.

Rounding off the list, the entry-level 75W card, the 4GB Arc A310, looks to arrive around the $99 mark. In totality, the list suggests Intel’s Arc A-series pricing fits between $150 and $399. Of course, this is a leak, so it’s far from confirmed.

Still, where Intel’s Arc A-series prices fit is intriguing. Intel’s graphics cards will eventually have RTX 4000 and AMD RDNA3 cards to compete with. So, pitching behind the current generation of cards for price feels like a fairly safe spot.

That does depend on delivered performance though. Undoubtedly, being the new arrival, Intel will have work to do on consistency, drivers, and more. But competitive pricing is a good start. If the suggested Arc A-series pricing can be maintained, it’s a potential bonus for attempting to establish a foothold.