Installing Windows 11 on a Raspberry Pi 5 has one specific hurdle that’s hard to overcome

A Raspberry Pi 5 single-board computer displayed with a Windows 11 logo, suggesting a guide to installing or running Windows 11 on the device.

You can trust PC GuideOur team of experts use a combination of independent consumer research, in-depth testing where appropriate – which will be flagged as such, and market analysis when recommending products, software and services. Find out how we test here.

Last Updated on

We all know by now the capabilities of the deceptively powerful single-board computer, the Raspberry Pi 5. After all, how many devices of this stature can actually be used as a home media center, a gaming station, or a Magic Mirror? However, like any tech piece, this diminutive machine can also face its own fair share of hard-to-overcome hurdles, especially when you start tinkering with it and pushing it to its limits.

That’s exactly what tech YouTuber leepspvideo revealed in their latest video, wherein they installed Windows 10 and 11 on the Raspberry Pi 5. Even though the latest Raspberry Pi board can finally run Windows 11, it’s still limited in terms of internet connectivity since Ethernet, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth don’t actually work with the device. Instead, you’ll have to use a few dongles to introduce these features into the board.

Raspberry Pi 5 internet connectivity is a problem

In fact, Tom’s Hardware writer Les Pounder experienced this exact issue upon attempting to install Windows 11 on the Raspberry Pi 5. Based on their article, no amount of dongle switching and experimenting helped resolve the issue, instead leaving them “with a rather lovely-looking brick.” However, as more enthusiasts continue to experiment with the board and find out ways to make its usage more efficient, it should only be a matter of time until these problems are resolved and you can finally create your own Raspberry Pi 5 gaming PC without issue.

In the meantime, check out some of the best uses for the Raspberry Pi 5 so you can continue tinkering with it. If you haven’t grabbed one yet, take a look at where to buy a Raspberry Pi 5 instead.

Nico is a Tech News Writer for PC Guide. He is also adept at finding a good deal every now and then, stemming from his days penny-pinching as a broke college kid.