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Table Of Contents  How to Build Your Own PC - Save A Buck And Learn A Lot
 9  Chapter 6: Connecting Components
      9  Connecting the Power Cables

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Connecting the Power Cables
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Power to Floppy Drive
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Power to the Mainboard

The standard ATX power supply connector is a 20-pin connector (see Figure 8) which can be plugged in correctly by noticing the clip on one side of the connector lines up with a notch on the socket. Push the connector down and it will click into place (Figure 102 and Figure 103).


Figure 102: Connecting ATX power to the mainboard

Here we are connecting the power before the ribbon cables have been installed.

 



Figure 103: ATX power connected to mainboard

This is the only power source the Athlon mainboard needs. Pentium 4 mainboards will also use a special 4-pin power connector. To prevent damaging your system, these connectors are designed so they can only be plugged in one way. A little clip will help you orient the power connectors.

 


Pentium 4 systems also make use of a special four-pin connector (Figure 9). If you’re building a Pentium system, connect the four-pin connector. It also has a clip to help show orientation. If you’re building an Athlon system, you won’t need this four-pin power connector.

When in doubt, examine your mainboard manual to see where power connectors go.


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Connecting the Power Cables
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Power to Floppy Drive
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