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Thread: Gbit switch only running at 12MB a second...

  1. #1
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    Question Gbit switch only running at 12MB a second...

    Hi.

    I have just put in a new Gbit switch to replace the old 100 speed one, but I am not getting any speed difference.

    When trying to copy a large DVD image of about 6.8GB, it still takes about 5 minutes as it did on 100 speed.

    Looking at both computers network connections, they report that they are connected at 1.0Gbps, but the speed of transfer is 12.5MB per second or so.

    It was my understanding that Gbit networking was good for up to 125MB a second, or certainly faster then 12.5MB which is the same as the old speed.

    Both machines are XP Pro SP3.
    All wiring is CAT-5e.

    QUESTION: Does it need to be CAT-6 for Gbit to work at the higher speed?

    Here is a link to the chart which says what the speeds should be:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_device_bandwidths
    Last edited by Mini-Me; 04-01-2012 at 09:09 PM.
    "An expert is someone who will tell you why you can't do something." - Alec Issigonis (designer of the Mini)

  2. #2
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    Cat 6 or Cat 5e

  3. #3
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    That's interesting then - my cabling should therefore be compliant.

    Any ideas why I am being forced into slow speed?
    "An expert is someone who will tell you why you can't do something." - Alec Issigonis (designer of the Mini)

  4. #4
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    Any kink in the cabling will degrade the speed, any terminal issues will do the same.

  5. #5
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    Are you copying from an internal hard drive to an internal hard drive?

    What brand of switch? I've seen really cheap knockoffs that still cannot push more than 100mbps despite being labelled as Gigabit.
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  6. #6
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    @ PrntRhd - No kinks that I am aware of, but that is not to say there are none - I would have to crawl the cable to see if there were any.(which I might do)

    @ azzey - Internal HDD to internal HDD. TP-Link TL-SG1008D Gigabit Switch.

    What is the general consensus on TP-LINK product?
    This is my first TP-Link device...
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  7. #7
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    I use TP-Link products (routers, access points and bridges, wifi cards and dongles) almost by default and have never had any issues with them over the past decade or so.

    Signals can degrade not only from faulty cabling but from badly connected RJ45 plugs that allow for a significant extent of unshielded wiring. Network speeds will always be limited by the weakest link in the chain and this would of course also be dependent on any NICs in use.
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  8. #8
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    OK, thanks for that. Nice to know that TP-LINK are not a crap product or something, which might have been the problem.

    I will do a test - I will buy a couple of new CAT-6 patch leads, connect two computers together via the Gbit switch in the same room and run some more tests - it is conceivable that my wiring is not up to spec. I have been doing quite a bit of rewiring of the rest of the house, so might need to do the network cables too.

    I'll keep the thread posted.
    "An expert is someone who will tell you why you can't do something." - Alec Issigonis (designer of the Mini)

  9. #9
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    I started using TP-Link products because they are so much cheaper than most of the better known competitors. So I started with some hesitation but now use them as first choice. The last items I used were a pair of powerline adapters and they are superb if you want to avoid channeling lengths of ethernet cable. I bought them from Amazon.
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  10. #10
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    There can be many things that slow down the network. Besides the ones already mentioned there can be interference from running along side power cables, around of over light fixtures. Or simply a bad cable somewhere along the way. The old saying goes that 90% of network issues are cable related.

    This thread caused me to test my own LAN speeds, which has Gbit switches and Cat6 cable, and I was surprised to find I am only getting just over 3MB/s transferring a 5GB movie from my HTPC to my main system. Well this explains why playing Bluray on my main system no longer works very well when it used to play just fine. Something I noticed awhile back but didn't pursue simply because I rarely watch movies on my main system and forgot about it.

    Obviously I have a bad cable or something going on. Time for some troubleshooting...
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Komski View Post
    The last items I used were a pair of powerline adapters and they are superb if you want to avoid channeling lengths of ethernet cable. I bought them from Amazon.
    They look interesting...
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    1. I have this in use...
    Devolo 1409 dLAN 200 AV Wireless-N Starter Kit...
    And can recommend it.

    It has 3 network sockets PLUS wireless-N.
    Really easy to set up and use.
    It's certainly costing for the extra capability though.

    I use it to stream movies [by cable, but tried the wireless connection, and it worked OK] to my Sony smart TV from Lovefilm via my modem and router.

    I could also connect my new ATA [for VOIP hardware internet phone] to the router using the powerline adapter, but prefer to have it connected direct, and use [newly bought] wireless DECT phones.

  13. #13
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    Devolo was the first brand of powerline "bridge/repeater/router" that I ever used. They are fine but twice the price of the TP-Link ones. When purchasing the same or similar try to get ones that fit your nation's sockets - otherwise you will need the relevant power adapters.
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    UPDATE: The speed has improved over the last few days - not aware of any need for a Gb switch to need a run-in time, but now the transfer speed is about 40-50MB per second, which is heaps better then before. Still running on CAT-5e. It seems to have sorted itself out, at any rate...
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    That sure sounds like something along the lines of 'transient interference'...which means it could be anything, but one thing is probably sure, one or more cables has poor shielding. Also, look for appliances that may have been 'on' a couple of days ago that aren't now...heating/air conditioning units, anything with a motor...anything that can generate RF...heck, even solar activity.
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    No shielding at all - standard CAT-5e twisted pair network cable. It is completely unshielded, just four pair(blue orange green brown) in a blue sheath. So is CAT-6, albeit the orange pair has a tighter twist in it, so unless you guys use different cable over there, to what we use here, but I doubt it. The whole idea of a standard, is so that it is global...

    Do you use a shielded cable over there?
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    Not usually, the UTP (UTP=Unshielded Twisted Pair) cable is cheaper and the twists make the interference attenuate without requiring shielding.
    What I was pointing out: the quality of the terminals and the pattern of twists are critical, keeping the proper distance between the data cables and any nearby AC power circuit wires is also critical.

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    No STP here, only UTP. The big difference between Cat5e and Cat6 is that 6 has the plastic core that keeps the pairs separated reducing crosstalk, especially over longer runs. The core also makes it more of a pain in the butt to work with.

    Only reason I have Cat6 is because I happen to get a really good deal on a 1000' box one day. Couldn't pass up $75 and free shipping for 1000' of Cat6.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlreich View Post
    The big difference between Cat5e and Cat6 is that 6 has the plastic core that keeps the pairs separated reducing crosstalk, especially over longer runs. The core also makes it more of a pain in the butt to work with.
    Oh, you are SO right - it is a MAJOR pain in the posterior, stripping this cable. I have had to fit-out many new houses using this CAT6 cable, and it is just a pain to work with, if you don't mind my paraphrasing you for a moment...
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  20. #20
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    Well...the twists do take the place of actual shielding, true. But a poor/bad connection on one of the wires of a pair effectively removes the 'shielding' and actually act as an antenna. I usually use UTP, too.
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