How long do Cable Routers Last?

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Regardless of how good or expensive a cable modem is, it will eventually require replacement. Before purchasing a cable modem router, remember how long it will last and why it might need to replacing.

How long do cable modem routers last?

Generally speaking, most cable modem routers only last 4-7 years. But sometimes your ISP will recommend you replace it before that. You might consider the same if you are buying it from a store. They may present you with different reasons which might be true or baseless. However, it can be best to change routers occasionally for better performance.

Why do you need a replacement router?

There isn’t an exact reason for the need for a replacement. When providing you with a router, your ISP may ask you to replace it after a year or two to earn their commission. 

However, some genuine reasons often force replacements, such as if your modem is old enough and is experiencing power disruption or surges due to dust mites, heat, or more extended periods of use. Therefore, it is time to go with the replacements.

Changing an ISP may also require modem replacements. All modems are not universal; similarly, not all ISPs will require the same modem router due to technological differences. Hence it will again raise the need for a replacement.

Last but not least, your modem may need help to handle the latest internet speeds. If you own a 200 Mbps capacity cable modem router in good condition and have upgraded your internet plan to a 500 Mbps connection, will it be possible for your 200 Mbps connection to keep up with your new connection?

Conclusion

Determining when your cable modem router will need replacing relies significantly on time and your current needs. If your router is worn out from years of use or needs to upgrade for better performance, you might want to consider buying a new one.

Kevin is the Editor of PC Guide. He has a broad interest and enthusiasm for consumer electronics, PCs and all things consumer tech - and more than 15 years experience in tech journalism.